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Boro Jackets Short 00_WEB.jpg

This is a patched work coat, or noragi, that likely never began as a full garment, but was rather made from multiple, very small patches — some of them the size of a postage stamp — that were all sewn together to create an area of cloth, and then layered.

Credit:

courtesy of Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

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  • Boro Jackets Long 00c_WEB.jpg

    This is a boro, long work-coat called a nagagi. Very thick, with layers, because it's been patched so many times. Abrasions to the surface of the coat come from decades of wear. These kinds of coat were handed down through generations and worn by many different members of the same family, becoming a kind of living history embodied in cloth.

    Credit:

    courtesy of Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

  • Boro Jackets Short 00_WEB.jpg

    This is a patched work coat, or noragi, that likely never began as a full garment, but was rather made from multiple, very small patches — some of them the size of a postage stamp — that were all sewn together to create an area of cloth, and then layered.

    Credit:

    courtesy of Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

  • Boro Jackets Short 01d_WEB.jpg

    A sodenashi, which literally means "a sleeveless garment" once common in old Japan and used for various types of outdoor work. The sleeves and collar were removable, making it versatile for both summer and winter wear.

    Credit:

    courtesy of Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads.

  • Boro Jackets Long 01_WEB.jpg

    This is a boro, long work-coat called a nagagi. Very thick, with layers, because it's been patched so many times. Abrasions to the surface of the coat come from decades of wear. These kinds of coat were handed down through generations and worn by many different members of the same family, becoming a kind of living history embodied in cloth.

    Credit:

    courtesy of Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

  • Boro Momohiki Trousers 00_WEB.jpg

    An indigo dyed cotton pair of momohiki, a traditional, tight-fitting legging that was worn by almost everybody in old Japan — men and women alike. This type of legging was worn well into the mid 20th century in rural areas.

    Credit:

    courtesy of Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

  • IMAG1389.jpg

    Melissa Howard has a very hard time finding a distressed, white,
    cotton t-shirts from the 1950-1970s, because people tended to throw
    them away or use them as rags. This shirt features a meticulously
    re-stitched collar among other homemade repairs. Workwear carries
    secret clues about the history of its wearer if you know how to "read"
    the clothing, like selective fading around suspender marks, or
    "whiskers" on the denim.

    Credit:

    Alina Simone

  • IMAG1394.jpg

    A white, canvas button-down workwear jacket that has been "tattooed" with handmade ink drawings. Found in the Adirondacks and probably dates from the 1940s.

    Credit:

    Alina Simone