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Human Needs

This story is a part of

Human Needs

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As global warming causes sea levels to inch up, many Palauans are finding the Pacific Ocean starting to flood into their back yards.

Credit:

Ari Daniel

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    As the water creeps up their shorelines, Island nations around the world are being forced to consider what rising sea level will mean to their way of life.

    Credit:

    Ari Daniel

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    The livelihood of many Palauans is tied to the sea. Many learn to swim before they learn to walk.

    Credit:

    Ari Daniel

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    Conservation officer Rodney Esebei says he's become wary of the sea, something almost unheard of in Palau.

    Credit:

    Ari Daniel

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    Despite the concern of their president and many others, Palauan congressman Marhence Madrangar says many Palauans aren't sufficiently educated about the threats of climate change and sea level rise.

    Credit:

    Ari Daniel

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    When Typhoon Haiyan flattened the small island of Kayangel in November of 2013, about 20 of its residents were evacuated to this community hall in another part of Palau.

    Credit:

    Ari Daniel

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    Kids evacuated from Kayangel play basketball outside of their temporary home, in a part of Palau no less vulnerable to flooding.

    Credit:

    Ari Daniel