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Corporal Patricia Mututu (left), a 30-year Kenya Wildlife Service veteran, and Ranger Mildred Oduor on patrol in Nairobi National Park.  Hundreds of Kenya Wildlife Service rangers have been shot by poachers in the last three years; 13 have been killed.

Corporal Patricia Mututu (left), a 30-year Kenya Wildlife Service veteran, and Ranger Mildred Oduor on patrol in Nairobi National Park. Hundreds of Kenya Wildlife Service rangers have been shot by poachers in the last three years; 13 have been killed.

Credit:

Valerie Hamilton

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    Kenya Wildlife Service Ranger Mildred Oduor. Being a ranger “gives you identity, it gives you your heritage,” Oduor says.

    Kenya Wildlife Service Ranger Mildred Oduor. Being a ranger “gives you identity, it gives you your heritage,” Oduor says.

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

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    Endangered white rhinos in Nairobi National Park.  Used in some Asian traditional medicine, rhino horn can fetch up to $200,000 on the black market. A rhino was killed in the park in August, the first case of poaching in Nairobi in six years.

    Endangered white rhinos in Nairobi National Park. Used in some Asian traditional medicine, rhino horn can fetch up to $200,000 on the black market. A rhino was killed in the park in August, the first case of poaching in Nairobi in six years.

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

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    Paul Mbugua, Kenya Wildlife Service spokesman, says traffic in elephant ivory and rhino horn is now controlled by international “cartels.”  “The leading cartel that we know worldwide is drugs. Number two, comes in human trafficking, and number three comes

    Paul Mbugua, Kenya Wildlife Service spokesman, says traffic in elephant ivory and rhino horn is now controlled by international “cartels.” “The leading cartel that we know worldwide is drugs. Number two, comes in human trafficking, and number three comes wildlife trophy trade.”

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

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    Corporal Patricia Mututu (left), a 30-year Kenya Wildlife Service veteran, and Ranger Mildred Oduor on patrol in Nairobi National Park.

    Corporal Patricia Mututu (left), a 30-year Kenya Wildlife Service veteran, and Ranger Mildred Oduor on patrol in Nairobi National Park.

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

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    Ranger Mildred Oduor (left) and Corporal Patricia Mututu inspect damage to a Nairobi National Park picnic area caused by a Cape buffalo.  “Some may say [being a ranger] is a good job,” says Oduor, “but others may not like it because it has a lot of risk.”

    Ranger Mildred Oduor (left) and Corporal Patricia Mututu inspect damage to a Nairobi National Park picnic area caused by a Cape buffalo. “Some may say [being a ranger] is a good job,” says Oduor, “but others may not like it because it has a lot of risk.”

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

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    The Conservation Heroes Monument stands at the entrance to Kenya's Nairobi National Park, a memorial to wildlife rangers killed in action. Increasingly, they're being killed by poachers.

    The Conservation Heroes Monument stands at the entrance to Kenya's Nairobi National Park, a memorial to wildlife rangers killed in action. Increasingly, they're being killed by poachers.

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

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    At Nairobi National Park, the long list of names of rangers killed on the job.

    At Nairobi National Park, the long list of names of rangers killed on the job.

    Credit:

    Valerie Hamilton

In Science, Tech & Environment.

Tagged: NairobiAfricaKenyaDavid OdundoMildred OduorPatricia MututuPaul MbuguaValerie HamiltonivorypoachingNairobiKenya Wildlife Serviceelephantpark rangerrangerNairobi National Park.