A bakery in the Çukurcuma neighborhood makes a fresh batch of sesame-encrusted rings of bread, called simit. 

Books

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Nektaria Anastasiadou’s “A Recipe for Daphne” passes as a light, escapist novel with a love story. But at its core, it’s a meditation on Rum identity and the scars of history. 

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Food is the core of Anastasiadou’s novel, "A Recipe for Daphne." One character, a baker, spends months trying to resurrect an Ottoman-era recipe that represented harmony between the region’s diverse ethnic and religious groups. Today, a bakery in the Çukurcuma neighborhood makes a fresh batch of sesame-encrusted rings of bread, called simit. 

Credit:

Durrie Bouscaren/The World 

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