A woman holds a banner that reads "Free abortion covered by social security" during a pro-choice march to celebrate the government ending its plan to reform Spain's abortion law in Madrid September 28, 2014. Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy on Tuesday

Reproductive rights

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Since becoming legal in 1985, right-wing politicians have periodically made feeble attempts to limit or ban access to abortions. Each time it happens though, the action is met with strong pushback from the public. 

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A woman holds a banner that reads "Free abortion covered by social security" during a pro-choice march to celebrate the government ending its plan to reform Spain's abortion law in Madrid September 28, 2014. Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy on Tuesday scrapped proposed changes in the abortion law that would have made Spain one of the most difficult countries in Europe in which to terminate an unwanted pregnancy.

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Susana Vera/Reuters 

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