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March 08, 2017

Women's work

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March 08, 2017

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Jordanian lawyer and human rights activist Asma Khader (left), with The World's Shirin Jaafari

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Shirin Jaafari

Women around the world face varying degrees of gender discrimination in the workplace — whether they're hired, how much they're paid, whether they advance as fast as men doing the same job. In Jordan, where girls and women generally do better than their male counterparts in school, and where more women than men attend college, startlingly few women participate in the workforce. Why?

Asma Khader, a Jordanian lawyer, women's rights activist and former government official, weighs in, in a conversation with The World's Shirin Jaafari.

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Stories in this episode

Business, Economics and Jobs

Why do so few women work (for pay) in Jordan?

Get a good education, and the world's your oyster, right? Not necessarily, if you're a woman in Jordan. While Jordan has one of the highest female literacy rates in the Middle East, and there are more women in college there than men, gender discrimination still abounds in the workplace. This is not just costing women, it's costing Jordan — half to almost a full percentage point of GDP growth each year, says the Brookings Institution. What's at play here? Jordanian lawyer and human rights activist Asma Khader shares her thoughts with The World's Shirin Jaafari.

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