United States

Coronavirus Conversations

Discussion: What's next in the effort to fight the coronavirus outbreak?

Updated

One month after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic, how close are we to flattening the curve and end the virus’s spread? As part of a series of conversations taking questions right to the experts, The World's Elana Gordon moderated a discussion with epidemiologist Caroline Buckee, who will assessed the response to COVID-19 and our current understanding of the virus, vaccines and treatments.

Top of The World

Balancing restrictions and lifting lockdowns; Pandemic tests global leaders; Immigrants and DACA recipients are on the front lines of coronavirus

Europe is looking for balance between reopening countries and keeping new infections of the coronavirus under control. In the US, the president melts down as reporters question his leadership. And, immigrant farmworkers and DACA health care providers are essential in the fight against COVID-19 in the US. But they are at risk. Also, astronaut Cady Coleman has suggestions on surviving self-isolation. But if space tips aren't your jam, there's also the Finnish tradition of getting päntsdrunk.

Top of The World

Trump cuts WHO funding; online threats increase amid pandemic; deportations could be spreading COVID-19

US President Donald Trump has cut funding to the World Health Organization, prompting swift condemnation from international leaders. Cybercrime has increased during the novel coronavirus pandemic. But a group of cybersecurity experts is volunteering to help fend off attacks. And deportations from the US, the country hardest-hit by COVID-19, continue amid the global health crisis. Those proceedings could be spreading the virus farther.

COVID-19: The latest from The World

Racing to develop a drug to fight COVID-19

Doctors in China and the US have transfused antibodies from recovered patients directly into the blood of people with severe cases of COVID-19. Dr. Mario Ostrowski and his collaborators want to identify the genes that encode these antibodies and use them to mass produce lab-grown versions — to turn into a drug to treat the infection.