Uganda

Tree Planting for Carbon Raises Questions

More than a decade ago nations agreed that richer countries should pay poorer countries for "clean development" that reduces carbon emissions. The first tree carbon project in Africa under this agreement is now underway. But the trees aren't native, and t

Conflict & Justice

Being gay in Uganda

It's already against the law to be gay in Uganda. But some legislation being proposed there would drastically increase the existing penalties. We hear from Long Jones (pictured), an openly gay Ugandan living in Kampala.

Poultry Promise

Could the lowly chicken seriously alleviate poverty and hunger in developing countries? Putting chickens in the hands of women farmers in east Africa is yielding powerful results, and hunger experts are taking notice.

Conflict & Justice

Being gay in Uganda

A Ugandan government minister has said that a proposed law which includes the death penalty for some homosexual acts is ?not necessary?. The bill sparked international condemnation. Jeb Sharp talks with Maria Burnett, researcher for Human Rights Watch.

Global Politics

A DDT debate in Uganda

In Uganda, a government program to battle malaria using DDT has provoked a fierce backlash. Some fear the government is poisoning them. Yet many public health experts say the risks of DDT are far less than the risks of malaria. On PRI's The World.

Arts, Culture & Media

Art and trauma

Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with American artist Ross Bleckner about his work with children in Northern Uganda who had been forced to become soldiers for a murderous rebel group.

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Justice

Uganda's other refugee crisis

Uganda has been celebrated in recent years for its generosity toward those fleeing violence, especially South Sudanese refugees. But state-sponsored discrimination and social intolerance have forced many gay, lesbian and transgender Ugandans to seek asylum outside the country.

Conflict

How do you judge a child soldier?

More than 30,000 children were kidnapped during Uganda's civil war, and many were forced to become child soldiers. Today, the country grapples with a complicated question: how to judge their atrocities.