Thailand

Global Politics

Burma aid effort

Jack Chance reports from the Thai town of Mae Sot, which has become a hub for aid agencies trying to get into Burma; the government is allowing shipments of food and supplies, but barring aid workers from entering the country to assist with distribution.

Aid for Burma

'The World' reports on the foreign aid to Burma, which was devastated by a cyclone that left more than 22,000 dead.

Thailand's second war on drugs

Orlando de Guzman reports from Bangkok that Thailand is launching a second 'war on drugs;' five years ago the country drew international condemnation when its first anti-drugs campaign resulted in the death of more than two-thousand people.

Arts, Culture & Media

Thai army TV

Thailand's military announced today that all its troop movements will now be broadcast on the Army's TV station, and Host Marco Werman finds out why from the BBC's Jonathan Head in Bangkok.

Prosecuting prostitution abroad

Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Melissa Farley, director of the non-profit group "Prostitution Research and Education," about the prostitution scandal that led New York Governor Elliot Spitzer to resign -- and about prostitution laws around the world.

Business, Economics and Jobs

Cola for the Muslim World

Mecca Cola is a popular beverage in the Middle East, and now it's gaining ground in other Muslim parts of the world, and Correspondent Orlando de Guzman reports Mecca Cola is surpassing rivals Coke and Pepsi in predominantly Muslim regions of Thailand.

Criticizing the king in Thailand

It's against the law in Thailand to criticize the King; Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Giles Ungpakorn, professor of political science in Bangkok, who's fallen afoul of that law.

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Technology

A tech startup called OMG wants to revolutionize cash for hundreds of millions of 'unbanked' people in Asia

Bangkok-based OmiseGO envisions a world where cash is digital and free-flowing, stored on blockchains, accessible by smartphones and effortlessly zapped across borders. It's a human right, they say. And they're starting with Asia's farmers, merchants, migrants and factory hands, who are now quite likely to own smartphones but may not have bank accounts.

Religion

Stuck in Bangkok, Saudi teenage apostate deftly turns to Twitter

Updated

An 18-year-old Saudi woman is using social media to alert the world to her situation: As she was attempting to flee what she said was an abusive family, Thai officials stopped her while she was en route to Australia. She's now holed up in the Bangkok airport, but the world is watching, thanks to her Twitter account.