Rwanda

Conflict & Justice

Part III: Born of genocide

Many Rwandan women who are genocide survivors are also rape survivors. Thousands of them bore children as a result and those children, and their mothers, now live at the margins of Rwandan society.

Conflict & Justice

Children born of the Rwandan genocide

Thousands of Rwandan women became pregnant as a result of mass rape during the Rwandan genocide. The children born of those pregnancies are now coming into adolescence -- on the margins of Rwandan society. The World's Jeb Sharp reports.

Conflict & Justice

Part III: Reintegrating Rwanda's killers

Rwanda faces a huge challenge nearly 13 years after the genocide. Huge numbers of people were killed but huge numbers of people have also been implicated in the killings. The Rwandan government wants justice for the victims but it also wants to promote reconciliation. So it's created a program of community service. It's designed to help confessed killers ease back into society.

Conflict & Justice

Part II: Rwanda's gacaca courts

In Rwanda, a huge legal experiment is underway. It's called Gacaca. Since 1994 the government has struggled to administer justice to hundreds of thousands of genocide suspects. A UN court was set up in Tanzania to try high level suspects. The regular Rwandan courts began processing the rest. But they were soon overwhelmed. So the government adapted a traditional form of dispute resolution into a grassroots apparatus for trying genocide cases.

Conflict & Justice

Part I: Rwanda genocide memorial

Nearly 13 years have passed since the genocide in Rwanda. Changes are sweeping the African country. Makeshift courts are trying thousands of suspected killers for the crimes of 1994. President Paul Kagame is pushing an ambitious reform agenda and signs of development are everywhere. But even as Rwanda moves on, it does not want to forget. So, it's also a country of powerful, haunting memorials.

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