Nepal

Health

Why many women in Nepal have had to deal with the disaster on their own

Most of those Nepalis affected by the earthquake in April were women who have had to deal with the disaster on their own. Journalist Purvi Thacker happened to be in Nepal last month when the earthquake hit. She describes meeting women faced with the reality of providing aid on the ground and dealing with their own destroyed homes and lives.

Development

How drones are helping relief efforts in Nepal

Updated

Global Medic, an aid agency based in Canada, is using drones — or UAVs — to help scope out remote areas in need of aid. And while they can't deliver supplies just yet, the group says they're still a vital way to get quick results when disasters hit.

Development

Human interest stories obscure the real human needs in Nepal

Days after the earthquake hit Nepal, Shrochis Karki says some rural villages have still seen few signs of help. And while he's been working from his home in England to coordinate relief efforts, he says part of the blame lies with the world's fixation on dramatic human interest stories and not real problems.

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Environment

China's economic rise fuels growth among outdoor pursuits

China has beautiful countryside that has long attracted foreigners. But the country's meteoric economic rise has given its own people more time for their own outdoor and leisurely pursuits. The problem, though, is that all of the additional tourists and hikers are putting a strain on the environment.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

It's easy to win an election when dissent could send you to jail

Egypt's military leaders were hoping for a major turnout in this week's constitutional elections. And while they got a few percentage points more turnout than the last constitutional referendum, the result was almost unbelievable: 98 percent approval. Of course, when demonstrating against the referendum leads to arrest and when the biggest opponent boycotts the election what do you expect? That and more in today's Global Scan.