India

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Spain reports more deaths than China; Zimbabwe doctors strike; India's 1.3 billion people head into lockdown

Spain reports the world's second-highest number of deaths due to the novel coronavirus after Italy, as India locks down 1.3 billion people and Zimabwean doctors issue desperate calls for basic medical equipment. The US Senate is likely to vote on a $2 trillion economic stimulus package after days of intense negotiations. And while this summer's Tokyo Olympic Games have been postponed, one Mexican American breakdancer hopes to go for gold in Paris in 2024.

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No new domestic coronavirus cases in China; Leaders move to stabilize economies, Trump pushes $1 trillion package; In the shadow of Franco’s legacy, Spain faces its fascist history

China has reported no new domestic cases of the novel coronavirus as the epicenter of the oubreak moves to Europe. US President Donald Trump is calling for a $1 trillion economic package, including $500 billion in direct payouts to Americans. And in Spain, reverberations from history: The legacy of former dictator, Gen. Fransisco Franco still lingers — even after being erased from the national record.

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A hotel in Spain is under lockdown; Hosni Mubarak has died; Rio’s Carnival floats put drama and comedy in motion

A hotel on Spain’s resort island of Tenerife was put on lockdown after a visiting doctor from Italy tested positive for the novel coronavirus. And, longtime Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, ousted during the 2011 Arab Spring protests, died today at age 91. Also, happy Fat Tuesday (or Pączki Day for some)! We head to a “dream factory” in Rio as the city celebrates Carnival.

Top of The World

Coronavirus continues global spread; 'America loves India'; Israel strikes sites in Gaza and Syria

The novel coronavirus continues to spread as four countries in the Middle East announced their first cases and Italy is issuing lockdowns. US President Donald Trump is in India, where he and Prime Minister Narendra Modi are touting their close relationship. And in Chile, women are calling for political change with a traditional form of protest — embroidery.

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Arts, Culture & Media

Diplomatic gaffe at the UN

Last week India's foreign minister made his UN debut with a speech in front of the Security Council. The only problem is, he read the speech of the Portuguese foreign minister. Anchor Lisa Mullins talks to Colum Lynch, who covers the UN.

Arts, Culture & Media

Indian singer Sona Mohapatra

Indian singer-songwriter Sona wanted her label Sony, to record more of her songs. Sony said wait. Sona went to Nokia. The World's Marco Werman tells us about Sona's attempts to market her music differently in a country dominated by Bollywood.

Environment

Give peace parks a chance

Parks and natural areas can be an important part of international diplomacy and peace building between countries in conflict. That's according to University of Vermont professor Saleem Ali who edited the new book "Peace Parks: Conservation and Conflict Resolution." Dr. Ali talked with host Bruce Gellerman.

Environment

World's cheapest car, The

Host Steve Curwood talks with Sunita Narain, director of the Center for Science and the Environment in Delhi, about what the Nano Car could mean for the developing world and how India should handle its transportation issues.

Environment

U.N. World Water Day

March 22nd is Water Day, designated by the United Nations as a time to call attention to water woes around the world. Host Bruce Gellerman talks with Paul Faeth, executive director of Global Water Challenge, about some of the work non-profits are doing to bring water to communities in the developing world.

Environment

Dangerous assumptions

An article in "Nature" asserts that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has seriously underestimated the technological solutions necessary for the stabilization of the climate. The commentary is titled "Dangerous Assmptions" and it's co-authored by Senior Scientist Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Environment

Damming the developing world

While interest in building hydro-electric dams is waning in the U.S., developing nations are increasingly turning to rivers to power their growing economies. Guest: International Rivers Director Patrick McCully about dams in the developing world.

Environment

Golden Rice

Rice genetically modified to produce Vitamin A could be the answer to some developing world childhood health problems. But some are voicing concerns. In a story originally produced for 'The DNA files' Julie Grant reports for Living On Earth.

Environment

Lead in the Developing World

The U.S. recycles almost all car batteries, but that's not true in many developing countries. Sifting through waste to retrieve lead is a major source of income, and lead exposure, for many people in poorer countries. Living on Earth reports.