India

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New reports on surveillance, 'demographic genocide' of Uighurs; Israel hesitates on annexation; Russian election comes to close

New reports on China's policies toward Uighurs show draconian efforts to cut birthrates and surveil the largely Turkic-speaking and Muslim population. Israel hesitates with moving forward on annexing part of the West Bank. In Russia, a week-long vote comes to a close. A Eurovision spoof film is inspiring covers from real musicians.

Coronavirus Conversations

Discussion: What's next in the fight against the coronavirus?

The coronavirus pandemic has infected more than 9 million people globally and caused 440,000 deaths worldwide. With countries starting to reopen while we await vaccines and treatments, what can we expect next and how can we prepare and respond? As part of our series of conversations addressing the coronavirus crisis, The World's Elana Gordon moderating a discussion with epidemiologist Caroline Buckee from Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Top of The World

North Korea destroyed the liaison office with the South; Beijing imposed coronavirus restrictions; France backs away from chokehold ban

In a dramatic escalation of tensions, North Korea blew up the liaison office used to improve relations with South Korea on Tuesday. And, in a move to stop a flare-up of new coronavirus cases, Beijing has imposed restrictions on public transport and banned high-risk people, such as those in close contact with others who have tested positive for COVID-19, from leaving the city. Also, three Indian soldiers were killed today in a confrontation with Chinese troops in the disputed border region of Kashmir.

Top of The World

Coronavirus cases surpass 5 million; New laws expected to crack down on Hong Kong; Cyclone Amphan kills dozens

After the worst day for infections on record, the number of confirmed coronavirus cases worldwide passed the 5 million. And as China prepares for its annual National People’s Congress on Friday, new laws cracking down on Hong Kong’s independence are expected to be proposed today. Also, the coronavirus has wreaked havoc on the performing arts, and some people in London are wondering if it’s curtains for the city’s West End theater district.

Top of The World

One of the strongest cyclones in a decade makes landfall in India and Bangladesh; Germany announces rules to block hostile takeovers of health care companies

The deadly Cyclone Amphan made landfall today in India and Bangladesh as millions evacuated amid the coronavirus crisis. And, Germany announced new rules that give the government the power to veto hostile takeovers of health care companies. Also, Canadian activists say they’re being targeted by China.

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Arts, Culture & Media

Diplomatic gaffe at the UN

Last week India's foreign minister made his UN debut with a speech in front of the Security Council. The only problem is, he read the speech of the Portuguese foreign minister. Anchor Lisa Mullins talks to Colum Lynch, who covers the UN.

Arts, Culture & Media

Indian singer Sona Mohapatra

Indian singer-songwriter Sona wanted her label Sony, to record more of her songs. Sony said wait. Sona went to Nokia. The World's Marco Werman tells us about Sona's attempts to market her music differently in a country dominated by Bollywood.

Environment

Give peace parks a chance

Parks and natural areas can be an important part of international diplomacy and peace building between countries in conflict. That's according to University of Vermont professor Saleem Ali who edited the new book "Peace Parks: Conservation and Conflict Resolution." Dr. Ali talked with host Bruce Gellerman.

Environment

World's cheapest car, The

Host Steve Curwood talks with Sunita Narain, director of the Center for Science and the Environment in Delhi, about what the Nano Car could mean for the developing world and how India should handle its transportation issues.

Environment

U.N. World Water Day

March 22nd is Water Day, designated by the United Nations as a time to call attention to water woes around the world. Host Bruce Gellerman talks with Paul Faeth, executive director of Global Water Challenge, about some of the work non-profits are doing to bring water to communities in the developing world.

Environment

Dangerous assumptions

An article in "Nature" asserts that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has seriously underestimated the technological solutions necessary for the stabilization of the climate. The commentary is titled "Dangerous Assmptions" and it's co-authored by Senior Scientist Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Environment

Damming the developing world

While interest in building hydro-electric dams is waning in the U.S., developing nations are increasingly turning to rivers to power their growing economies. Guest: International Rivers Director Patrick McCully about dams in the developing world.

Environment

Golden Rice

Rice genetically modified to produce Vitamin A could be the answer to some developing world childhood health problems. But some are voicing concerns. In a story originally produced for 'The DNA files' Julie Grant reports for Living On Earth.

Environment

Lead in the Developing World

The U.S. recycles almost all car batteries, but that's not true in many developing countries. Sifting through waste to retrieve lead is a major source of income, and lead exposure, for many people in poorer countries. Living on Earth reports.