Germany

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The risks of reopening too early; Afghanistan suffers attack on maternity hospital; Researchers in Senegal are developing coronavirus home test kit

Germany considers pulling its "emergency brake" as coronavirus cases climb after some lockdown measures were lifted. Chancellor Angela Merkel is one of several women in leadership who have been relatively successful at handling the crisis. And, in Senegal, researchers are working to design a kit that can test for the coronavirus at home. It could help solve the problem of under testing on the continent. Also, Amsterdam's recovery plan focuses on "doughnut economics," while in Sweden, one restaurant is taking solo dining to the middle of a meadow.

Coronavirus Conversations

Live discussion: How do we reopen workplaces safely amid the coronavirus crisis?

Updated

Governments around the world are looking to start reopening society. But there have been a variety of approaches, and many people want to know: When is it safe to go back to work? As part of our weekly series taking your questions to the experts, The World's Elana Gordon moderated a discussion with Joseph Allen from Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health discussing how to make an office environment safe amid the coronavirus crisis.

Top of The World

Germany has 'emergency brake' in case of virus surge, US shelves CDC guidelines; Iraq approves new government, prime minister

As Germany eases coronavirus restrictions, Merkel announced an "emergency brake" mechanism in case of a new surge. In Iraq, a new prime minister has taken office. Hunger among immigrants and refugees is another crisis facing the US. And as federal funds lag, Irish people step up to help Native American tribes. And, one stay-at-home trio has the tunes to get you through isolation. Finally, Andy Serkis offers an outlet for quarantine with a marathon reading of LOTR: "See, my precious, if we has it, then we can escape."

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Workers' movements advocate for rights on May Day; Saudi activists allege man killed over megacity plans; Doctors wait hours as Venezuela faces fuel shortages

As May Day celebrations and rallies have been curtailed, workers around the world are pushing for their rights. Fuel shortages are making life harder for Venezuelans, especially essential workers. And even as Lebanon teeters on the edge of economic collapse, some Americans are choosing to ride out the pandemic there. Meanwhile, Sweden's gardeners have become real party poopers.

Top of The World

High-profile Syrian war crimes trial opens; Countries debate rescue packages, billionaires ask for bailouts; Missouri sues China over economic coronavirus losses

Germany begins the trial of two Syrian officials accused of crimes against humanity in the Syrian civil war. The US and Europe discuss huge economic rescue packages. Also, billionaries are asking for relief. And, drug cartels are among the many industries hit by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Plus, desperate parents on the US-Mexico border are sending their children to seek asylum alone, hoping it will give their kids the best chance for their future.

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German police nab terrorism suspects

The World's Matthew Bell reports on the latest from Germany, where police say they've foiled a plan to carry out major terrorist attacks. Three suspects have been arrested. Investigators say they were plotting to attack American targets, including the main US military base in Germany.

The end of the plastic bag?

The plastic shopping bag is a major shopping convenience, but it's also a major environmental blight, and some countries, like Australia and China, plan to phase out the use of the bags completely

Global Hit

Global Hit - Complaints Choirs

The World's Patrick Cox update us on a cultural phenomenon that began in Europe but has now gone global. People from Finland to Singapore are getting together to form "Complaints Choirs."

Geo answer

Today's answer is the German seaport of Bremerhaven. That's where a special ship powered in part by a giant kite began its maiden voyage today. Anchor Lisa Mullins finds out more from the ship's captain, Lutz Heldt.

Recovering East German Stasi documents

East Germany's Secret Service, or Stasi, kept extensive records on its citizens during the Cold War but tried to destroy them when its government toppled in 1989, but now German computer scientists are trying to repair those documents

Sports

Geo quiz

The answer to today's geoquiz is Aachen, Germany, where Japan's oldest Olympic athlete is preparing for the Summer Games in Beijing. Anchor Lisa Mullins explains.

Global Politics

Finding a home for Africom

The World's Katy Clark reports that the Bush Administration has made slow progress when it comes to Africom -- a US military command for Africa that's aimed at promoting development and security on the continent