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Coronavirus Conversations

Discussion: How the coronavirus crisis is exacerbating food insecurities and global inequities

Updated

The coronavirus crisis has exacerbated existing crises of food insecurity and health disparities. And mass protests around the world continue to spotlight deep-seated inequities faced by communities of color. As part of our weekly discussion series on the global pandemic, The World's Elana Gordon moderated a conversation exploring the global food supply and inequities, presented with Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Coronavirus Conversations

Discussion: What's next in the fight against the coronavirus?

The coronavirus pandemic has infected more than 9 million people globally and caused 440,000 deaths worldwide. With countries starting to reopen while we await vaccines and treatments, what can we expect next and how can we prepare and respond? As part of our series of conversations addressing the coronavirus crisis, The World's Elana Gordon moderating a discussion with epidemiologist Caroline Buckee from Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

COVID-19: The latest from The World

Brazil’s government hid coronavirus stats. Critics say that poses big problems for fighting the pandemic.

Updated

This is only the latest of Brazil’s tumultuous fight with the coronavirus. The country has over 710,000 confirmed infections, the second-highest number of cases after the United States. It recently overtook Italy as the country with the third-highest number of COVID-19 deaths in the world, with more than 37,000 deaths.

Top of The World

Symbols of 'racist past' topple amid global BLM protests; New Zealand reports no active COVID-19 cases

A statue of a British slave trader in the UK and confederate statues in the US have been toppled or defaced as protesters demand a reckoning on systemic racism. Some Minneapolis City Council members said they will “begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department." New Zealand has no active cases of COVID-19 in the country. Brasilia has become a new hotspot for the virus.

Top of The World

Rwandan genocide suspect found after decades; The dangers of 'vaccine nationalism'; Probe launched after Trump ousts State Dept. watchdog

After two decades at large, Félicien Kabuga, one of the accused perpetrators of the Rwandan genocide, has been apprehended. And, the World Health Organization is convening a global assembly to coordinate the fight against the coronavirus, but diplomatic rows could undermine the effort. And some warn of the risks of "vaccine nationalism." Also, in New York's Little Manila, the community is coming together to take care of Filipino health workers, who play an outsize role in US health care.

Top of The World

Iranian sailors dead after 'friendly fire' incident; India, UK ease restrictions, but Brazil struggles as hot spot

An Iranian missile struck its own vessel in an accident in the Gulf of Oman. In Afghanistan, families are demanding answers after Iranian officials allegedly drowned 45 migrants. Also, India is restarting train service, and the UK is sending mixed messages about reopening. But in Brazil, the country can't seem to lock down. And, Mother's Day is a huge day for the flower industry, but this year, many beautiful blooms are headed for the trash.

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Cyro Baptista

Brazilian-born Cyro Baptista was named the 2007 Percussionist of the Year by the Jazz Journalists Association. He's on Fair Game to discuss his music, and his latest album, Banquet of the Spirits.

Arts, Culture & Media

Cyro Baptista

Brazilian-born Cyro Baptista was named the 2007 Percussionist of the Year by the Jazz Journalists Association. He's on Fair Game to discuss his music, and his latest album, Banquet of the Spirits.

Arts, Culture & Media

Cyro Baptista

Brazilian-born Cyro Baptista was named the 2007 Percussionist of the Year by the Jazz Journalists Association. He's on Fair Game to discuss his music, and his latest album, Banquet of the Spirits.

Business, Economics and Jobs

Paulo Morelli

Director Paulo Morelli talks to Faith about his new film, City of Men, the sequel to City of God, his 2002 Academy Award-nominated film that delved into the culture of Rio De Janiero's sprawling "favela" slums.

Environment

Economy of green

Creating green jobs in the next decade will spur the American economy towards future growth. That's according to Dr. Joseph Stiglitz, a 2001 Nobel Prize winner and economics professor at Columbia University, who talked with host Steve Curwood.

Environment

Green goes to the boardroom

More and more companies are finding ways to make economic growth with environmental benchmarks part of their mandates. Fred Krupp, author of 'Earth: The Sequel' and president of Environmental Defense Fund, tells host Steve Curwood, the profit motive that helped create global warming can also help solve it.

Environment

Vision of a sustainable city

In honor of Earth Day, we revisit some of our favorite stories. When reporter Cecilia Vaisman visited Curitiba, Brazil in 1994, she learned how a city with a growing population and outdated infrastructure transformed into a sustainable and wonderfully livable city, with lots of green space, recycling programs, and an efficient rapid transit system.

Environment

Urban visionary

Curitiba, Brazil's model sustainable city, was largely the brainchild of Jaime Lerner. As three-time mayor of the city, he created a rapid transit bus system, increased the amount of green space, and encouraged children and adults alike to recycle. Jaime Lerner joins host Steve Curwood and says all cities have the potential for environmental success.