Europe

Lifestyle & Belief

Does France's 'burqa ban' protect — or persecute?

In 2004, France banned the wearing of all conspicuous religious symbols in grade schools. Then, in 2010, France enacted the so-called "burqa ban," making it illegal for Muslim women to wear the traditional face and body covering in public. These rules, based in France’s extreme separation of church and state, have stirred debate over whether France is protecting secularism or stifling religious freedom.

Business, Economics and Jobs

The new regulars at this French café are migrants living in a nearby camp

There are frequent protests in Calais, where the largest camp in France for migrants is located. But is was the appalling living conditions at Grande-Synthe, 30 miles away, that got the attention of Doctors Without Borders. Migrants there try to find the best ways to cope — for many men, that means becoming regulars in a local café. Some in the town even call it 'the Migrants' Café.'

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.