Africa

Lifestyle & Belief

These Kenyan widows are fighting against sexual 'cleansing'

In some rural parts of Kenya, widowhood means you’re of little value. Culturally, widows are considered impure, and tradition dictates that they must be cleaned — or “cleansed” — of their partners’ death. The aim is to chase away the demons; the ritual requires women to have sex — either with a relative or stranger.

World hunger is on the rise again, and climate change is a culprit

Some 821 million people now face food insecurity, raising numbers to the same level as almost a decade ago. The situation is worsening in South America, Central Asia and most regions of Africa, according to the UN's annual food security report. A resurgence in the use of "cover crop" and nanotechnologies may mitigate climate change impacts.

Pages

Global Politics

Kenya's HIV challenge

Sheri Fink reports from Kenya on a public health challenge that comes on the heels of Kenya's own post-election crisis: thousands of Kenyan AIDS patients left their homes during the recent violence

Environment

Insurance report

The World's Jason Margolis reports that some insurance companies are starting to make global warming a factor in their policies, in some cases encouraging positive action to deal with climate change.

Global Politics

Rebuilding Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe's economy is in a free fall but experts say the country has a good economic base to recover from -- if the political situation stabilizes, as The World's Jason Margolis reports.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo answer

The answer to today's Geo Quiz - name the 4-thousand mile rift passing through Africa - is the Great Rift Valley. It's a major bird migratory route between Asia and Africa. The World's Quil Lawrence took in a bird-watching tour on another stop along the way of that migration -- northern Israel recently.

Health & Medicine

World malaria day

Anchor Katy Clark gets two perspectives on the global battle against malaria: one view is that of Abdullahi Boru, a BBC correspondent who contracted malaria as a teenager; the other view is that of Nils Dauliere