Tunis

Conflict

'Tunisians are in shock' after a massacre in Tunis

Two gunmen killed more than 20 people in Tunisia on Wednesday, shocking the country that many people have called the Arab Spring's only meaningful success story. And while most of the dead were tourists, a Tunisian journalist says locals are feeling the deaths strongly.

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Conflict & Justice

Cyber attacks on Tunisia

The World's Clark Boyd tells how cyber attacks on Tunisia are linked to the country's human rights record. He interviews Slim Amamou, a Tunis-based tech entrepreneur and free speech activist who has now been arrested by Tunisian authorities.

Global Politics

Tunisia's 'Jasmine Revolution'

Esther Kohler, a radio journalist reporting from Tunis and Ben Abulkareem Abdullah, a photographer and blogger who has been at the forefront of the Jasmine Revolution talk about the uprising and what citizens are expecting now.

Conflict & Justice

Political unrest continues in Tunisia

After an uprising drove out Tunisia's unpopular and oppressive president out more than a week ago, political unrest continues. David Kirkpatrick, Middle East correspondent for The New York Times and Renee Rutta, an American living in Tunis, explain.

Conflict & Justice

Reforming Tunisia's justice system

Moves to restructure the justice system in Tunisia are hitting a roadblock: members of the former regime still control the judiciary and are stalling the work of an anti-corruption commission. Reporter Megan Williams has the story from Tunis.

Conflict & Justice

Why Tunisians Worry about the Future

The "Arab Spring" kicked off in Tunisia with the overthrow of strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. But many worry about what's next; there's fear that either Ben Ali supporters or radical Islamists might hijack the fledgling democracy. Don Duncan reports.