Rio de Janeiro

Global Politics

Brazil could soon outlaw abortion altogether

Currently, Brazilian women can only obtain legal abortions in cases of rape, life-threatening pregnancy or a fatal brain defect in the fetus. The constitutional amendment, known as PEC 181, was originally intended to extend maternity leave for mothers of premature newborns.

Conflict

Residents of a crisis-ridden Rio caution future Olympic hosts

Thousands of police have been taken off Rio’s streets in the past year, city clinics are closing their doors, and there has been dismal interest in patronizing Rio’s $20 million Olympic golf course — built on an environmental reserve — and the almost completely unsold luxury housing that was once the athlete’s village.

Business

Rio's best café lets you pay what you want

There are no cashiers. No cash registers. No computers to ring up bills and no credit card machines. Instead, there is just a bowl, into which people drop voluntary cash amounts. Remarkably, the honor system is working, says Curto Café’s owner.

Pages

Business, Economics and Jobs

Paulo Morelli

Director Paulo Morelli talks to Faith about his new film, City of Men, the sequel to City of God, his 2002 Academy Award-nominated film that delved into the culture of Rio De Janiero's sprawling "favela" slums.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo answer

For today's Geo Quiz we were looking for the names of two countries. These countries are on different continents... literally oceans apart. But they're closer than you think when it comes to cooking. We're talking about India and Brazil. Some Chicago chefs have been combining the two countries' culinary traditions, as The World's David Leveille has more.

Global Politics

Life in Brazil's favelas

President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva says that during his administration millions of people were lifted out of poverty, including those living in Rio's notorious favelas. Reporter Jason Strother visited the Rocinha favela, to find out what residents think.

Breakthrough' pill could help prevent HIV

Scientists recently announced a potential breakthrough in the prevention of HIV. A pill normally used to treat HIV was found to protect gay men from becoming infected with the virus. Solana Pyne reports from Rio de Janeiro.