Port-au-Prince

Environment

Haiti aftermath: the situation on the ground

Ansel Hertz, a freelance journalist in Port-au-Prince, gives us a sense of the situation on the ground this morning. He tells us about the weakened infrastructure, the fears residents have about buildings collapsing and the tension on the streets.

Environment

Grim scene on the ground in Haiti

The situation on the ground is grim. We hear from Christina Boyle a reporter for The Daily News who landed in Port-au-Prince last night. We also talk to Takeaway contributor Femi Oke, who spent the evening with Haitian immigrants in Flatbush, Brooklyn.

Haiti devastation emerges

The extent of the devastation from the earthquake in Haiti is slowly emerging, with thousands of people feared dead.

Arts, Culture & Media

Global Hit

At the heart of Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, there's a bustling street market. That's where you'll find Antoine, a man dubbed the market's "walking jukebox." We hear a selection of his music in an audio postcard sent by reporter Ruxandra Guidi.

Pages

Business

Eight years after the earthquake, a different taste of Haiti

After the 2010 earthquake devasted Haiti, there was an outpouring of international support. Eight years later, most of those who rushed in to help are long gone. But many of those who remain are people with ties to Haiti, and ome of them started businesses that are getting some traction.

Food

In food-insecure Haiti, street vendors play a central role in feeding the capital

Earlier in July, protests against price hikes paralyzed Port-au-Prince, but the demonstrations also forced the closing of one of the capital’s sources of affordable food: the informal street chefs known as “manje kwit.” With stands near markets and bus stops, these vendors offer meals for $1 or less, and their fare is a lifeline for many of the capital’s food-insecure residents.