Port-au-Prince

Food

In food-insecure Haiti, street vendors play a central role in feeding the capital

Earlier in July, protests against price hikes paralyzed Port-au-Prince, but the demonstrations also forced the closing of one of the capital’s sources of affordable food: the informal street chefs known as “manje kwit.” With stands near markets and bus stops, these vendors offer meals for $1 or less, and their fare is a lifeline for many of the capital’s food-insecure residents.

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Arts, Culture & Media

Global Hit

At the heart of Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, there's a bustling street market. That's where you'll find Antoine, a man dubbed the market's "walking jukebox." We hear a selection of his music in an audio postcard sent by reporter Ruxandra Guidi.

Global Politics

Special assignment in Haiti

Until recently, Haitian journalist Michele Montas was on call 24/7 for U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon. When she retired from her post, she vowed to do 'three months of nothing'. However, that was before an earthquake destroyed her home city.