Hiroshima

Earth Ear

The desert winds blow through the old rusted hangar in Utah where the Enola Gay, the airplane that dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, was once housed.

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Justice

As Hiroshima's survivors age, their need to speak out grows

In the fourth part of a 2005 series on the lingering mental health effects of the atomic bomb, what is the psychological effect of surviving an atomic bomb blast, and the radiation that followed? Researchers say Hiroshima's survivors, often stuck living in the past, are plagued by their "maximum authority" as direct witnesses and struggle with a "lifelong encounter with death."

Conflict

Respect: A young tour guide, a Hiroshima survivor and a baton passed

Updated

It's 70 years this week since the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. It killed about 70,000 people instantly. Tens of thousands more died of radiation sickness. We'll be spending some time this week considering how the attack is remembered. Who tells the story of Hiroshima? And who listens?

Justice

Matahara: When pregnant women, new moms are harassed at work

A lawsuit has drawn the Japanese public's attention to "matahara": a word coined from the English "maternity harassment." It refers to the practice of demoting or even laying off women when they become pregnant. It's against the law in Japan, but still widespread. Advocates hope giving it a name will start to change that.

Justice

Hiroshima survivors want more than a US apology

There’s something else that survivors of the A-bomb want: They want the world to agree to no more Hiroshimas. If the visit by John Kerry — and perhaps a future visit by Barack Obama — can help secure that, that would be more meaningful than a formal apology.