Global Scan

This crash test dummy family is getting an overweight uncle — to reflect America's expanding waistlines

America's rise in obesity isn't just raising health alarms. It is challenging designers of all sorts of consumer products, including car safety experts, who are moving to a morbidly-obese crash test dummy. Meanwhile, in Russia, Apple's gay CEO is under attack. France and Spain, however, seem more worried about clowns. Those stories and more in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US government is spending millions to save a few dozen fish

In Death Valley, Nevada, there's a hole that is home to just a few dozen fish. But these aren't any fish — they were at the center of an environmental debate over endangered species that went to the Supreme Court some 40 years ago. Meanwhile, a British man gets a new bionic hand for less than $500. And Denmark is considering a ban on elective circumcision. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Irish women ride the rails to protest restrictions on abortion

Women in Ireland resurrect a protest tactic from four decades ago to fight the country's restrictive abortion laws. While in China, police crack down on an alleged "brothel" run out of a university hotel. It apparently gave discounts to those who had a student ID. And if you are a gravedigger, or anyone with a professional, or morbid, interest in the dead, there's a new dating site for you. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Consumerism knows no bounds when it comes to taste

With Halloween coming, there's a great deal of hand-wringing over potentially offensive and racist Halloween costumes. This "Sexy Ebola Nurse' outfit isn't racist, but it probably is offensive. Meanwhile, in China, the country considers dropping counterfeiting from the long list of crimes subject to the death penalty, and a burglar runs into his victim at the bank. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

ISIS thanks the Pentagon for its errant weapon airdrop

The Pentagon has been stepping up its efforts to reinforce Kurdish forces in Iraq and Syria as they battle ISIS terrorists. An airdrop in Kobane this week was meant to bolster them at a crucial time, unfortunately some of the supplies went off target. Plus a look at how humans came to eat dairy and a prohibition on kissing at a Zimbabwe university. Those stories in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A computer saves a Russian man from a bear attack

Encounters between hungry bears and people are increasingly common in Russia. But one encounter had an unexpected twist — and suggests a new use for that outdated computer. Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, the city's top leader says the city's poor can't be trusted with the right to vote. And Rwanda starts screening Americans for Ebola. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

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