Environment

Jane Goodall: 60 years of research, activism and inspiration

Sixty years ago, in July 1960, Goodall arrived in what is now Gombe National Park, Tanzania, to begin her groundbreaking research on chimpanzees, and ever since, Goodall has been advocating for conservation of the natural world. Goodall believes COVID-19 emerged "entirely because of our disrespect for animals and the natural world.”

Justice

Why US immigration judges are leaving the bench in record numbers

The US immigration system is situated within the Department of Justice, a law enforcement agency. That's always been a problem, explains Judge Ashley Tabaddor. But under the Trump administration, immigration judges have faced "unprecedented micromanagement" — and it's causing many of them to resign or retire early.

Top of The World

Tempers flare over EU coronavirus stimulus deal; Oxford vaccine shows promise; Latina artist says goodbye to Goya

European Union leaders' negotiations extended into a fourth day on Monday as they try to hammer out a deal to revive economies battered by the coronavirus pandemic. Also, a potential coronavirus vaccine being developed by scientists at Oxford University shows strong immune response and no early safety concerns. And in Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro said that lockdown measures used to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus "kill" and have "suffocated" the country's economy.

Top of The World

Court rules Shamima Begum can return to Britain for appeal; Russian hackers accused of trying to steal COVID-19 vaccine research; Privacy Shield ruled invalid

A British appeal court ruled today that Shamima Begum, who in 2015 went to Syria to join ISIS, can return to the United Kingdom to challenge the government's removal of her British citizenship. And, officials from the US, Britain and Canada said today that Russian hackers are trying to steal COVID-19 vaccine research. Also, Europe's highest court has ruled that the so-called Privacy Shield trans-Atlantic data transfer deal is invalid.

Global Politics

US toughens its stance against Chinese aggression in South China Sea

In a statement this week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the world will not allow Beijing to treat the South China Sea as its "maritime empire." Bonnie S. Glaser, senior director for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, joins The World's Carol Hills to discuss the significance of this policy shift and what it means for China-US relations. 

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