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Conflict & Justice

Our stories in this section range from war to peace and fairness to freedom across the globe

Conflict & Justice

First-time voters

1.4 million legal immigrants applied for US citizenship last year, and the vast majority were Latinos; spurred by frustration over immigration reform, many legal residents decided to become citizens and cast their vote

Conflict & Justice

Part I: Healing the victims

The scope of tragedy in eastern Congo defies comprehension. A war in the African country killed four-million people between 1998 and 2003 and one of the most gruesome features of the conflicts is the widespread use of rape as a weapon. The World's Jeb Sharp reports from Bukavu, in Congo's South Kivu Province.

Science, Tech & Environment

Give peace parks a chance

Parks and natural areas can be an important part of international diplomacy and peace building between countries in conflict. That's according to University of Vermont professor Saleem Ali who edited the new book "Peace Parks: Conservation and Conflict Resolution." Dr. Ali talked with host Bruce Gellerman.

Conflict & Justice

Part III: Reintegrating Rwanda's killers

Rwanda faces a huge challenge nearly 13 years after the genocide. Huge numbers of people were killed but huge numbers of people have also been implicated in the killings. The Rwandan government wants justice for the victims but it also wants to promote reconciliation. So it's created a program of community service. It's designed to help confessed killers ease back into society.

Conflict & Justice

Part II: Rwanda's gacaca courts

In Rwanda, a huge legal experiment is underway. It's called Gacaca. Since 1994 the government has struggled to administer justice to hundreds of thousands of genocide suspects. A UN court was set up in Tanzania to try high level suspects. The regular Rwandan courts began processing the rest. But they were soon overwhelmed. So the government adapted a traditional form of dispute resolution into a grassroots apparatus for trying genocide cases.

Conflict & Justice

Part I: Rwanda genocide memorial

Nearly 13 years have passed since the genocide in Rwanda. Changes are sweeping the African country. Makeshift courts are trying thousands of suspected killers for the crimes of 1994. President Paul Kagame is pushing an ambitious reform agenda and signs of development are everywhere. But even as Rwanda moves on, it does not want to forget. So, it's also a country of powerful, haunting memorials.

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