The World from PRX — A daily world news program

As sex clubs reopen across Europe, sex workers worry about their earnings and also whether they can stay safe. Niki Adams, a spokesperson with English Collective of Prostitutes, says the pandemic and lack of state support shows how far the industry still has to go to gain legal recognition.

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Facebook and other tech giants will temporarily stop processing requests for user data from Hong Kong authorities after China imposed a security law on the city that calls for greater supervision and regulation of Hong Kong’s internet. And, many sex workers continued to work throughout the COVID-19 lockdown, putting them at risk from abusive clients as well as the coronavirus. Now, brothels across the content are reopening, and authorities have issued a long list of hygiene rules. Also, most Pride activities around the world were canceled or moved online this year, but Shanghai Pride events continued as usual. But “as usual” means something very different in China compared to other places.

400 years: Slavery’s unresolved history
Environment
Immigration
Gender

The path to victory in the US presidential election in November cannot afford to ignore the Latino vote. But Latinas' voting power goes beyond their individual votes: They’re likely to encourage friends and family to vote, too.

New Zealand is “halfway down Everest,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said of the country’s battle with the coronavirus. New Zealand, Taiwan, Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Norway all have notably low rates of fatalities and Germany stands out in central Europe for its low death rate. The seven countries have something else in common: All are led by women. Is it a coincidence or are women leaders better at managing the coronavirus?

Conflict & Justice

The US spends billions and billions of dollars on defense, but the novel coronavirus slipped silently and invisibly across US borders and even onto military aircraft carriers. One could say the US was preparing for World War III when it got hammered by World War C — the coronavirus. 

Thought Brexit was over, right? Wrong. Britain did leave the EU at the end of January, but in reality, nothing much has changed. The real deadline is Dec. 31, and negotiations are set to take place until then. There’s just one problem: a pandemic.