Global Nation

Conflict & Justice

Here's an explanation about why there's a backlog of immigration cases

US immigration courts face major bottlenecks. It's a complex problem, tied to a shortage of judges, underfunding and different enforcement programs in the US used to deter migrants from crossing the US-Mexico border. And on top of all that, data shows that people from Central America and Mexico are less likely to get asylum than others.

Conflict & Justice

Without lawyers, 90% of children crossing into the US alone seeking safety could be sent back

Updated

Molly Castillo-Keefe helps migrant children in Chicago seek shelter and asylum. About half of them, she says, have experienced violence in their home countries. And if current numbers are any indication, nearly all of those seeking asylum from violence will be sent home if they don't find a lawyer to represent them.