Latest Stories Tagged: Conflict & Justice

Conflict & Justice

German lawyers to defend Somali pirates

A group of German lawyers seeks to defend nine Somali men accused of an attempted pirate attack on a German freighter. The alleged pirates are in custody in Kenya, where they face trial this week. Anchor Marco Werman speaks with one of the German lawyers, Oliver Wallasch.

Conflict & Justice

Walkout at the UN conference on racism

Today, western delegates at a UN conference on racism walked out as Iran's president gave a speech describing Israel as a racist regime. The U.S. and eight other countries are boycotting the conference over concerns the meeting would single out Israel for criticism. The World's Jason Margolis reports.

Conflict & Justice

Life in Chechnya today

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Rachel Denber, deputy director of the Europe and Central Asia Division of Human Rights Watch, about the current conditions in Chechnya as Russia officially ended its ten-year Russian military campaign there.

Global Politics

Piracy vs. privacy

When President Obama made his first public comments on the rescue of an American cargo shop captain from Somali pirates, he said "...I want to be very clear that we are resolved to halt the rise of privacy in that region." Some have called it a presidential flub, but The World's Jason Margolis says maybe so, but it's not as straightforward as it seems.

Global Politics

Sudan advocates' worry for Darfur

Darfur advocates say they're increasingly worried about the humanitarian situation in Sudan's Darfur, now that President Omar al-Bashir has expelled 13 foreign aid groups. And they say they're concerned the Obama administration is taking too long to address the looming crisis. The World's Jeb Sharp reports.

Global Politics

American journalist on trial in Iran

Iranian officials say the espionage trial of Iranian-American reporter Roxana Saberi could produce a verdict within two weeks. Wall Street Journal columnist Gerald Seib tells host Marco Werman that hardliners in Iran may be using Saberi's case to show Washington they can still play hardball.