Most Shared Stories Tagged: Europe

Resisting forced marriage in the UK

Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Jasvinder Sanghera, who was born in England to immigrant parents from India, and ran away from her parents after refusing to marry a man they had selected

Bank scandal in France

Correspondent Genevieve Oger has the latest on the discovery of a massive fraud hitting one of France's most important banks today

Geo answer

Today's geo quiz answer is Verona, in northeastern Italy. Anchor Lisa Mullins tells us about a village near Verona that is rumored to be a possible honeymoon destination for French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

Geo answer

Today's geo answer is the Ebro River in Spain. It's the site of one of the last battles of the Spanish Civil War. Many Americans fought in the Spanish Civil War...and their stories are chronicled by a group called the Lincoln Brigade Archives. Anchor Marco Werman finds out more from the group's chairman, Peter Carroll.

Geo answer

Today's answer is the German seaport of Bremerhaven. That's where a special ship powered in part by a giant kite began its maiden voyage today. Anchor Lisa Mullins finds out more from the ship's captain, Lutz Heldt.

Global Hit - Saba

Next week a new CD will come out by an Italy-based singer named Saba. Saba taps into the music of the horn of Africa. But as The World's Marco Werman explains, one geographic location doesn't fully reflect Saba's own story.

Love in Davos

Davos, Switzerland is getting a lot of attention this week as the site of The World Economic Forum, but it's also drawing other forums that are exploring other subjects, like the science of love

Italy's political limbo

The World's Gerry Hadden reports on Italy's political crisis as yesterday the country's center-left coalition government fell, after a raucous and -- some say -- undignified -- debate in the Italian parliament.

Words courtesy of Milton

The answer to today's Geo Quiz is Paradise, as in "Paradise Lost," the title of a poem by 17th-century English poet John Milton. Milton's poetry may have sounded "other-wordly" in his own time, simply because he invented new words to use in his work. The World's Alex Gallafent tells us that many of those words are still in use today.