technology

Global Politics

Kenya basically bans all drone use — despite potential benefits they may yield

There is vast potential for drone use in the developing world. In recent years, an explosion of initiatives has popped up across the continent of Africa, from unmanned peacekeeping missions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to Facebook’s high-hovering drones that bring the Internet to remote places. But the technology has proliferated faster than regulations can keep up. A couple countries have banned them altogether, including Kenya. Recent terrorist attacks have much to do with the restrictions there, but innovators think the country has more to gain from drones than it has to lose.

Conflict & Justice

North Korea puts its DMZ-crossing drone fleet on display

During a recent military celebration in the North Korean capital Pyongyang, goose-stepping soldiers, tanks, and allegedly nuclear-tipped missiles were paraded past the cheering throngs. Also on display? The reclusive nation’s fleet of military drones. And some of those drones have already crossed the border, posing a threat to both South Korea and the United States, which has 28,000 soldiers stationed near the demilitarized zone.

Conflict & Justice

Efforts to deploy drones for humanitarian purposes are hampered by public fears

Drones may be best known for their surveillance and military capabilities, but there’s a growing movement to use them for humanitarian aid. Inventor Mark Jacobsen is building drones to deliver humanitarian aid to Syrians stuck inside their war-torn country. But as he’s learning, bureaucracy — combined with public fears about the use of drones — has hamstrung efforts to get that aid anywhere near the Syrian border.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.