pollution

Science, Tech & Environment

A proposed Ohio gas pipeline is raising safety and property rights concerns for landowners in Ohio

Believe it or not, the Keystone XL pipeline is not the only pipeline in North America. Pipelines that carry natural gas from wells to refineries stretch hundreds of miles in the US, crossing public and private land. Many of these pipelines are planned for densely populated areas, and in some states, local opposition has been fierce.

Science, Tech & Environment

What deteriorating air quality looks like around the world

The Chinese government announced Monday that it plans to take more than five million vehicles off the road to improve air quality, including 330,000 cars in Beijing. This announcement comes only weeks after the World Health Organization announced that only 12 percent of cities reporting on air quality meet their standards for safe levels. With the help of our newsroom designers, we put together a list of places recently affected by deteriorating air quality and incidents of smog.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo answer

The Australian town of Bundanoon is the answer to today's Geo Quiz. This picturesque town in the mountains west of Sydney voted today to ban the sale of water in plastic bottles. Lisa Mullins speaks with environmental campaigner, Jon Dee, in Bundanoon.

Science, Tech & Environment

Storing CO2 underground

There are two ways to reduce carbon dioxide. Emit less or remove it from the atmosphere by sequestering it below the earth's surface. As Ashley Ahearn reports, some of the most promising research in this field is happening in Iceland. On PRI's The World.

Science, Tech & Environment

A new book documents China’s exploitation of Tibet’s natural resources

The recent agreement between the US and China to reduce greenhouse emissions made headlines — and rightly so. It was a big step for both nations. But, striking a balance between environmental protection and economic ascendance is much more complicated than that. In China especially, it seems, for every step forward, there are often two steps back. Its actions in Tibet are a prime example, according to a newly-published book.