innovation

Science, Tech & Environment

How a century-old rule is keeping the American legal profession from innovating like its foreign colleagues

If you want to get legal advice in Canada, you can swing by Wal-Mart. And in the UK, legal advice is handed out in grocery stores. But a rule implemented more than 100 years ago in the US keeps legal advice largely out of reach for most Americans and keeps innovations from changing the stodgy legal field.

Science, Tech & Environment

These university students have found a way to make prosthetic limbs affordable to the masses

The fact is, prosthetics can change the course of someone's life. But they're usually prohibitively expensive — available only to the well-insured and the well-to-do. But a team of graduate students in Massachusetts say they've found a way to build artificial limbs for just a few dollars, potentially making these life-changing devices available all over the world.

Global Politics

Meeting tackles cybercrime

Many computer fraud scams originate in West Africa. Today, computer experts from 20 West African countries met in Ivory Coast to discuss how to fight such Internet scams. Host Lisa Mullins speaks with the BBC's John James in Abidjan.

Global Politics

Created in China: Part I

China invented paper, printing, the compass and the seismograph, among the first to harness fossil fuels, and map the stars. Then, it lost its innovative edge. Now China hopes to lead the world in creativity. The World's Mary Kay Magistad has the story.

Global Politics

Explosive export

20 years ago, on the eve of the Velvet Revolution, Communist Czechoslovakia churned out tractors, Skoda cars, and Semtex. The explosive is still being manufactured in the Czech Republic and only there. The BBC's Tim Whewell explores the legacy of Semtex.