infrastructure

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Politics

Behind the Egyptian Crisis: Resource Stress?

The ongoing conflict in Egypt has deep roots in history, religion, politics and economics. But journalist Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed says another underlying cause is a growing resource crisis--shortages of food, water, energy, and a booming population.

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Politics

The destination of green stimulus dollars

In February, the federal government injected $787 billion dollars to stimulate the economy. A lot of that money went to so-called green projects. The World's Jason Margolis looks at where those green dollars are going and just how green those dollars are.