government

Conflict & Justice

Why Nigeria's government can't prevent the kidnapping of 100 teenage school girls

Violence in northern Nigeria took an ominous turn this week when at least 100 teenage girls were kidnapped from a school in the remote northeast. It's thought that the Islamist militant group Boko Haram took the young women to a forest near the border with Cameroon. Omoyele Sowore of Sahara Reporters blames what he calls an "incompetent" Nigerian government.

Global Politics

The man expected to be India's next prime minister just turned himself into a hologram

It's the largest exercise of democracy in the world, and candidates competing for India's prime minister position have a lot of ground to cover if they want votes. One candidate decided the best way to do that was to be in 100 places at once, quite literally. As a hologram.

Global Politics

Peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians are on the brink of collapse — with both sides casting blame

Israel and the Palestinians are blaming each other for dragging US-sponsored peace talks to the brink of collapse. After spending eight months trying to keep the two sides at the negotiating table, Secretary of State, John Kerry appears to be frustrated. "The leaders have to lead," Kerry said on Thursday. Host Marco Werman gets the latest from The World's Matthew Bell.

Conflict & Justice

Citizenship? No thanks, I'll pass for now

Along with gaining the right to vote and the responsibility of serving on a jury, some studies show new citizens make clear economic gains as well. But not everyone buys it. Naturalization rates in the US are extremely low. Of the more than 8 million people with a US green card, less than 40 percent will go on to naturalize. That's nearly a third of the naturalization rate in our neighbor to the north, Canada.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.