government

Development & Education

Happy 50th birthday, Zambia!

The southern African nation of Zambia gained independence from Britain on October 24, 1964. Half a century later, it’s one of the most politically stable countries in the region. But as Zambia celebrates its 50th birthday, some Zambians are turning their attention to fixing the problems of the future.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Arts, Culture & Media

Citizenship? No thanks, I'll pass for now

Along with gaining the right to vote and the responsibility of serving on a jury, some studies show new citizens make clear economic gains as well. But not everyone buys it. Naturalization rates in the US are extremely low. Of the more than 8 million people with a US green card, less than 40 percent will go on to naturalize. That's nearly a third of the naturalization rate in our neighbor to the north, Canada.

Conflict & Justice

Warren Harding's presidency

President Warren Harding's been known as our worst president. But various writers have begun to restore his reputation. James David Robenalt got his hands on love letters between Harding and his mistress Carrie Phillips. Marco Werman speaks with him.

Conflict & Justice

Why Nigeria's government can't prevent the kidnapping of 100 teenage school girls

Violence in northern Nigeria took an ominous turn this week when at least 100 teenage girls were kidnapped from a school in the remote northeast. It's thought that the Islamist militant group Boko Haram took the young women to a forest near the border with Cameroon. Omoyele Sowore of Sahara Reporters blames what he calls an "incompetent" Nigerian government.

Global Politics

Deserting from the FARC

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the country's largest guerrilla group known as the FARC, is losing thousands of its fighters. They're not dying�they're giving up. Correspondent John Otis reports.

Global Politics

Power sharing in Afghanistan?

Afghanistan might be heading toward a power sharing agreement between the two leading presidential candidates. The model has been tried in other nations but the results were mixed, as The World's Matthew Bell reports.