culture

Conflict & Justice

Tunisian breakdancers view their activity as an alternative to radical Islam — but it doesn't always work

The Rocking Steps Crew is a celebrated group of breakdancers, or b-boys. They bill themselves as an alternative to radical Islam. But sometimes the draw of breakdancing isn't enough. Seifeddine Rezgui, who gunned down 38 tourists on a beach last week in Sousse, Tunisia, was once an avid — if not especially proficient — b-boy.

Business, Finance & Economics

For adopted Guatemalans, a searcher will look for birth moms. But sometimes the reunions are fraught.

Guatemala shut down international adoptions in 2008. Before that, US families adopted some 30,000 Guatemalan children. Now those kids are growing up, and some want a connection with their birth families. Enter "searchers," who will try to track down birth families for a fee. But as one adoptive mom found out, that process can be difficult — and it's as unregulated as international adoption itself once was in Guatemala.

Development & Education

Language is the great equalizer at this school in Louisiana

For decades, East Baton Rouge Parish school district was under a federal desegregation order. The school district continues to struggle with diversity in its schools. However, one result of the desegregation order was the introduction of a language immersion elementary magnet school program. Language was used in two ways: both to attract middle class white families to the inner-city school and to equalize the dynamics inside the classroom between rich and poor, black and white

Arts, Culture & Media

The cat's out of the bag on the footloose language of the high seas, matey

There is a long history of seafarer slang. Many expressions like "run the gauntlet" have passed into modern English. Scouse, a dialect spoken in the port city of Liverpool, is littered with old British English seafarer terms. But as the shipping industry has become increasingly global—the crew might be from the Philippines, the captain from Greece, the ship chartered in Barbados — what's happening to the lingo of the high seas?