Arts, Culture & Media

Author Rory Carroll Reflects on Hugo Chavez's Political Rule in 'Comandante'

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Credit:

REUTERS

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez arrives at the international airport in Cancun February 21, 2010. Leaders of Latin American nations are in Cancun to attend the Rio Group summit meeting to be held on February 22 - 23. REUTERS/Gerardo Garcia

Venezuela is mourning its comandante.

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(This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview.)
It's now official.

President Hugo Chavez has died after a two-year battle with cancer.

Venezuela's Vice President Nicolas Maduro, made the official announcement Tuesday.

Chavez wasn't able to overcome the latest complications following his fourth cancer surgery in Cuba.

The news of Chavez's death didn't come as a surprise.

There's been intense speculation in Venezuela about his deteriorating health and the president had not been seen or heard in public for three months – ever since leaving for that surgery in Cuba in early December.

Still, now that it's official, Chavez's passing will generate new political turmoil in a deeply divided Venezuela.

The Venezuelan military has issued a statement vowing to protect the sovereignty and security of the country.

Stepping back from the uncertainty surrounding Venezuela's political future, we hear more about the man who dominated the country for the past 14 years.

Rory Carroll was Latin American bureau chief for Britain's Guardian newspaper.

He covered President Chavez in Venezuela for seven years.

And he's the author of a new book about Chavez, called "Comandante."

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