Arts, Culture & Media

The Many Meanings of Chips Funga

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'Chips Funga' video (Screen grab)

It's 2 a.m. in downtown Nairobi, Kenya. Wendy Kimani is doing what a lot of young people here do around this time: standing outside a night club, holding a bag of French fries. You can see the grease soaking through.

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"It tastes like heaven," says Wendy. "Greasy as hell. And we like it that way."

French fries to go – or chips funga as they're called here – are the late-night snack of choice in Nairobi. But recently, chips funga has taken on a whole new meaning.

"It's basically taking a lady home who you don't know," says singer Anto Neosoul. "You met her for the first time, and you take her home for a one-night stand."

Neosoul is a rising star on the Kenyan music scene. His song, 'Chips Funga,' has been riding high on the airwaves here for more than a year.

Neosoul says when he first heard the term chips funga he immediately got it. He says young Kenyans are constantly inventing new slang terms – in English, Swahili, and tribal languages.

The phrase chips funga started popping up on Facebook and Twitter about two years ago, says Harriet Ocharo, a 25-year-old technology writer. So she decided to blog about it. She asked readers about the "etiquette" of a chips funga. The comments started pouring in.

"No sleeping over," was one comment. "No phone calls before 9 p.m., like, there's nothing to talk about during the day, so you only call for the hook-up in the evening."

"No emotional discussions. All gifts are accepted; money is always good. No baby talk."

Ocharo says, at first, it was mostly men who used the term. But now, women use it too. They've even come up with a spin-off: sausage funga. You can probably figure out what that one means. Ocharo says women's use of these slang terms is a sign of the times in Nairobi, where women no longer feel bound by traditional gender roles.

"Nairobi is a very free town," says Ocharo. "No one judges a woman if she chips fungas a guy or the other way around. I think it's a good sign."

There's even an online dating site called Chips Funga.

But singer Anto Neosoul says he sometimes worries that young people in Kenya are chips funga-ing too much. And they're putting themselves in dangerous situations.

"We might contract HIV and AIDS," says Neosoul. "We might contract STDs and STIs, we might get pregnant."

Anto even worries that the term makes people want to chips funga – because it sounds funny and lighthearted. So he wanted his song to send a message: that it isn't necessarily good to be a chips funga. The third verse, which he sings in Swahili, does just that.

"If I put it in English," says Neosoul, "it would basically be, 'Put on some ketchup, put on some mayonnaise, put on some salad, you've just been served. So, you've had a one-night stand, and that's what you are. You're chips. You're French fries. You're vegetables. And you've made yourself cheap, like chips.'"

That's the message Anto wants people to hear. But it may be the opposite message that has them singing along.

Watch a 15-minute documentary of the chips funga phenomenon here.

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