Conflict & Justice

Mexicans Lament Omission of Drug War in US Presidential Debate

Mexico and its deadly drug war didn't merit a mention in last night's US presidential debate. That, despite the fact that the drug trade, and the violence that accompanies it has taken an estimated 60,000 Mexican lives.

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Sergio Aguayo teaches at the Colegio de México. He says drug trafficking, and the effort to combat it should be front and center in US national security policy.

"We, in Mexico, have a war. And that war is having consequences for American national security," Aguayo says. "I would have expected the recognition that something horrible is going on south of the border and that (officials) are starting to think and look at alternatives and work with the Mexican government."

In 2008, pollsters from a group called World Public Opinion found 54% of Mexicans supported US President Barack Obama. Now, the faction that identifies itself as pro-Obama is down to 43%. Only 7 percent of Mexicans described themselves as pro-Romney.

  • debate3.jpg

    Credit: REUTERS
    U.S. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney (L) and U.S. President Barack Obama shake hands at the conclusion of the final U.S. presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida, October 22, 2012. REUTERS/Win McNamee/POOL (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS USA PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION)
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    Credit: REUTERS
    Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and U.S. President Barack Obama at end of the final U.S. presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida October 22, 2012. REUTERS/Michael Reynolds/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS USA PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION)

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