Politics

Sierra Leone: Amputees gain confidence

boywithcrutches.jpg

Operation Rise, run by an American organization called The Peace Project, handed out crutches on Sept. 21, 2011, to landmine victims, polio sufferers and amputees from the brutal decade-long civil war in Sierra Leone. A boy carries some new crutches at one of the Operation Rise distribution centers in Aberdeen, Freetown.

Credit:

Jeremy Fokkens

  • boywithcrutches.jpg

    Operation Rise, run by an American organization called The Peace Project, handed out crutches on Sept. 21, 2011, to landmine victims, polio sufferers and amputees from the brutal decade-long civil war in Sierra Leone. A boy carries some new crutches at one of the Operation Rise distribution centers in Aberdeen, Freetown.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • crowd.jpg

    Many people line up to receive new crutches at Operation Rise's distribution center in Aberdeen, Freetown, on Sept. 21, 2011. Operation Rise distributed 10,000 pairs of crutches on International Peace Day, significant because many of those receiving aid were victims of the civil war in Sierra Leone.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • ambassador.jpg

    U.S. ambassador to Sierra Leone Michael Owen (center) and organizer Lisa Schultz (right) are shown around Operation Rise’s crutch distribution center in Aberdeen, Freetown on Sept. 21, 2011. Schultz said she thought the single day distribution of 10,000 crutches would have a tremendous impact on the morale of the country.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • waiting.jpg

    Handicap International and Médecins sans Frontières reported that around 4,000 people suffered from deliberate amputations during the conflict, and many bled to death afterward. Some of the victims are shown in this photo waiting to receive crutches from Operation Rise on Sept. 21, 2011.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • football.jpg

    Some of those receiving crutches planned on using them not only for every day life, but for competition, too. Here polio sufferers play soccer on crutches in Grafton in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 21, 2011.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • footballplayers.jpg

    These soccer players — shown playing in Freetown on Sept. 21, 2011 — are part of a group of about 300 amputee competitors throughout Sierra Leone who make up six different teams in the country.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • footballplayeroncrutches.jpg

    The Single Leg Amputee Sports Association formed in 2011 says one of its goals is to bring back a feeling of self-reliance to the amputees. Here a man on crutches takes part in a football game in Grafton in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 21, 2011.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • footballplayeroncrutches2.jpg

    A man on crutches takes part in a football game in Grafton in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 21, 2011. He and others participating in the Single Leg Amputee Sports Association also receive education and skills training from the group.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens

  • save.jpg

    Some players said they felt joining in soccer matches has helped their self-confidence. Here a goalie leaps from his crutches to make a dramatic save during a soccer match in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 21, 2011.

    Credit:

    Jeremy Fokkens