Lifestyle & Belief

Lesotho: Horses helping to fight HIV

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Potso Seoetoe on his horse Kro-Kart delivers medicines essential to the fight against HIV/AIDS to rural clinics in mountainous Lesotho.

Credit:

Christopher MacLean

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    Potso Seoetoe on his horse Kro-Kart delivers medicines essential to the fight against HIV/AIDS to rural clinics in mountainous Lesotho.

    Credit:

    Christopher MacLean

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    A Lesotho man on horseback in the mountainous country.

    Credit:

    Christopher MacLean

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    With 80 percent of the mountainous kingdom above 1,800 meters and few paved roads, horses and donkeys provide the most reliable form of transportation.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    With an HIV rate of 27.7 percent among pregnant women in Lesotho, the prevention of mother-to-child transmission is a critical component of the country’s fight against HIV/AIDS.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    With 80 percent of the mountainous kingdom above 1,800 meters and few paved roads, horses and donkeys provide the most reliable form of transportation.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    Potso Seoete volunteered to be a medical courier after his younger brother Mohlouoa died from HIV. He sits in front of his home where he is a maize, beans and wheat farmer.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    The additional income Potso gets from working as a courier helps him support his wife, Matankiso, and their daughter, Rebohile.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    Potso Seoetoe picks up his supplies at Mapholaneng clinic, shown here, before beginning his trek to drop off the medicines.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    These insulated medical bags transport the vital medical supplies remote villages need.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    These mother-to-baby packages prevent the transmission of HIV from pregnant mothers to their children. If taken from the fourth month of pregnancy until two months after birth, this medication has a success rate of well over 90 percent.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    Potso has named his horse Kroi-Kart, which means “Red Horse” in Sesotho.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    Potso says that the most challenging part of his job is the weather. “During the winter it is really cold, and during the summer rains the horse doesn’t want to cross the river,” he said. The EGPAF foundation have equipped Potso with this safety helmet and all weather, water proof riding suit.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean

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    The couriers travel long distances at high altitudes across difficult terrains that only horses can grip. Potso’s trip to the Modikadi clinic is roughly three hours in this direction.

    Credit:

    Christoper MacLean