Arts, Culture & Media

Slideshow: Future of Britain's Brutal Building

Preston Bus Station, once the largest bus station in the world, is slated for demolition as part of a redevelopment scheme.

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It is said beauty lies in the eye of the beholder.

But what about brutal beauty? Brutalism is a name for a style of architecture made popular in the 1950s and 60s.

The buildings are concrete and often considered now to be eyesores.

In Britain, there is a debate raging about whether to save an example of Brutalist architecture.

Preston Bus Station, once the largest bus station in the world, is slated for demolition as part of a redevelopment scheme. That is despite being on the list of endangered cultural sites by the 2012 World Monuments Watch.

Anchor Marco Werman talks to Erica Avrami about why Britain's Preston Bus Station is provoking strong reaction from those who want it preserved and those who want it destroyed.

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    The Roger Stevens Building at the University of Leeds is the centre piece to a large complex of Brutalist buildings connected by skyways. (Photo: Mtaylor848/Wikipedia)

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    preston

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    Preston bus station, in Preston, Lancashire, England. (Photo: Dr Greg/Wikipedia)

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