Science, Tech & Environment

Secret lives of animals captured by hidden camera

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Volcan Barva, Costa Rica. Puma concolor (Cougar). (Photo courtesy of Wildlife Conservation Society, a member of the TEAM network.)

Story from PRI's The World. Listen to audio above for full report.

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The group Conservation International has installed cameras in tropical areas in Brazil, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Laos, Suriname, Tanzania and Uganda. The cameras shoot pictures 24/7 for a study of mammals.

Conservation International has organized all 52,000 of these images and has released a study based on what these pictures reveal.

macacaJorge Ahumada, with Conservation International, explained the "camera trap study" on The World: "We use cameras to capture animals doing what they're doing. So the camera works with a heat censor, and so whenever there's a change in the heat signature in front of it -- if a warm body walks in front of it -- then it will trigger a number of images, and that's how we get these animals."

Photo: Southern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) in Indonesia. (Photo courtesy of Wildlife Conservation Society, a member of the TEAM network.)

View a slideshow of these pictures on The World website.

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PRI's "The World" is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. "The World" is a co-production of the BBC World Service, PRI and WGBH Boston. More about The World.

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