Conflict & Justice

Burmese youth speak

This 26 year old journalist crossed the Thai border three years ago telling her parents that she wanted to get an education. They have no idea she's now a journalist with the Democratic Voice of Burma. She worries her parents would face arrest if they found out about her occupation in Thailand. Youth Speak is a 10-minute weekly current affairs program and it's broadcast into Burma by satellite which can bypass the Burmese government censors. Today that journalist is editing a piece about last year's uprising by the country's monks against the military government. (How did you get this footage?) We got the footage from insiders. During the uprising it was young journalists with mobile phone cameras that provides DVB with footage of the protests. This 27 year old journalist was one of them and he was fired by his newspaper in Burma for taking photos of the uprising. Now he says it's much harder to get information and send it outside the country. the Features Editor of DVB agrees. He also says his insiders have to change their phones and emails every month to prevent getting caught. In the lead up to the anniversary of the uprising, DVB's website was taken offline for two days. Another exile news site has also come under cyberattack and this isn't the first time such actions against democratic voices in Thailand have been taken. Bloggers in Burma are keeping a low profile at this time and says bloggers and journalists have been warned of sending out information to exile news services. The Burmese military has accused bloggers and the exile media of lying. Despite the difficulties the producer from earlier says some day she's hoping DVB will have a station inside Burma and she can tell her parents she's proud of her job.

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