Science, Tech & Environment

Reporter in Burma

We traveled to the Delta and saw countless towns and villages that had been seriously damaged by the cyclone that hit over the weekend. One village with 700 was completely devastated. They heard help was coming from abroad but hadn't gotten any yet, and that was in an accessible area. The roads are broken or bridges are down in many other country areas. (What is the government doing in urban areas?) In the capitol, the water and electricity. The prices of many basic needs have gone through the roof. There's a lot of frustration and anger. But to be honest, things in the capitol are difficult but not catastrophic. The flooded areas are anyone's guess and the aid agencies have not been allowed in to analyze the situation there. disease will take hold. (What else can you tell us about what you're seeing there?) This has followed the trend of the tsunami in Southeast Asia or other recent disasters, but the difference is I'm not finding myself stuck in traffic jams of aid vehicles, the roads are not blocked with people bringing refugees in one way and aid going the other direction. This is not a country able to tackle this disaster and I think the Generals might be overwhelmed and don't know what to do.

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