Science, Tech & Environment

Our stories cover science, technology, engineering, mathematics, the natural world and the environment

Science, Tech & Environment

Who's messing with your Internet rights? And who'd tell you if they did?

Fears of terrorism and other threats have led many democracies to increase surveillance of Internet users, and to pressure Internet companies to censor information and share user data. Authoritarian governments have been doing that all along. What rights do you have, and what rights do you want, in the midst of all this? How are different companies protecting your privacy and digital rights? Rebecca MacKinnon, a former China correspondent and current director of the Ranking Digital Rights Project at the New America Foundation, gives some answers, and shares her concerns.

Science, Tech & Environment

Will these Alaska villagers be America's first climate change refugees?

The 8- to 10-foot-thick ice that once stretched way out to sea is all but gone. Increasingly powerful storms batter its exposed coastline. A lawsuit seeking damages from fossil fuel companies was refused by the Supreme Court. Now the residents of remote Kivalina, Alaska are now wondering how long they can hold out and if anyone is willing to help them.

Science, Tech & Environment

The America that most Americans never see

The Interior Department, responsible for the 59 national parks, has an extremely popular Instagram feed to share the beauty that the parks hold. And it's a good thing, a lot of us don't ever get to see the parks. One thing is certain if you've been to a national park recently — they are a huge draw for international tourists. Here are 20 amazing photos featured on the Interior's Instagram.

Science, Tech & Environment

Zanzibar's 'Solar Mamas' flip the switch on rural homes, gender roles

On the Tanzanian island of Zanzibar, hundreds of households too poor and remote to have access to the electrical grid are getting low cost solar power for the first time, from a group of local female engineers trained by and Indian NGO. It's the first of several "solar mamas" projects planned for parts of rural Africa, and it's turning some traditional gender roles on their head.