Global Scan

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Global Scan

How corruption and factionalism in Nigeria spawned Boko Haram

Boko Haram's reign of terror in Nigeria continues to claim more lives, their methods becoming increasingly more violent, while the government seems to become increasingly inept, perhaps intentionally. In a lengthy investigative report, Newsweek examines the Islamist terrorist group, and the conditions that have allowed it to flourish.

Global Scan

An 'uncontacted' tribe emerges from the Amazon — and into the dangers of modern life

Whatever drove them to it — perhaps encroachment on their land by illegal loggers or cocaine producers — an isolated Amazon tribe has made contact with the outside world, and that carries great risk for them. In the Middle East, Israelis and Palestinians talk of the risks they live daily from renewed conflict. And British intelligence conveniently loses some potentially incriminating documents, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'The Hong Kong we are living in today is not the Hong Kong we knew'

The British handed Hong Kong to China 17 years ago today. And the anniversary meant many thousands of residents made their annual protest claiming the country has gone downhill ever since. Meanwhile, a lawmaker claims Pakistan is not convicting any rapists. And the US makes a step toward eliminating its land mines ... in 20 years. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Spain may finally get to see a finished version of Gaudí's famous church — in Finland

Barcelona's famed Sagrada Familia church is still being built after more than a century. Now, impatient Finnish students plan to finish their own scaled-down version, imagined in this photo — out of ice. We also spotlight new relevations about Blackwater Security's lawless tactics during the Iraq War and wonder if Scotland's national dish is headed for the US, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Was the Taj Mahal built out of love ... or guilt?

The well-known story of the Taj Mahal is that a bereft emperor built it to honor his wife, who died in childbirth. But a new play in India suggests otherwise. In Brazil, some are analyzing the more prosaic plot lines that played out in Thursday's US-Germany World Cup match. And a young Jewish writer joins a gay pilgrimage to Israel, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

From Russia with smut: Inside the Soviet Union's porn collection

Russia allowed a rare glimpse inside its secret trove of porn, which Soviet officials snatched away from its citizens. Elsewhere, Ghana's government sent a planeload of cash to its World Cup heroes in Brazil to end a pay dispute. And PRI's The World answered all of your questions on the unfolding war in Iraq. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine may be heading for a crash as it gets pulled in two directions

Ukraine's president made a sudden about-face last week, rejecting overtures from the European Union in favor of keeping ties with Russia. But his people aren't willing to let go of Europe so easily. A South African hotel charges tourists to sleep in a fake slum, and everyday bribery is alive and well in Russia. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

At least President Hollande's scandal is entirely domestic

French President François Hollande is having a hard time getting any traction with his political agenda. Meanwhile, US officials are having a tough time moving past the diplomatic row with India over a diplomat accused of mistreating her housekeeper. And in Italy, a politician is finally saying enough is enough — with the racism she faces.

Global Scan

Caught in a bad romance?

Poor Ukraine is caught between two lovers as its president searches for a happy end to this love triangle. Amazon's cute little PrimeAir drone, delivering packages like a stork delivers babies, has about the same level of reality. And we explore the many faces of yoga, in today's edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

It's easy to win an election when dissent could send you to jail

Egypt's military leaders were hoping for a major turnout in this week's constitutional elections. And while they got a few percentage points more turnout than the last constitutional referendum, the result was almost unbelievable: 98 percent approval. Of course, when demonstrating against the referendum leads to arrest and when the biggest opponent boycotts the election what do you expect? That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Could São Paulo's drought affect the World Cup this summer?

In today's Global Scan, São Paulo, the world's sixth largest city and a host city for this summer's World Cup, is running dry. Without more rain soon, rationing will have to start. North Korea normally blocks all contact with the West, but it has an exception — a university just for the sons of the elite. And Argentinians use an app to police prices in the supermarket.