Global Scan

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Global Scan

This 'depressed' polar bear won't be getting a new home after all

Arturo, the "world's most depressed" polar bear was supposed to be heading to a better life in Canada — at least that's what activists wanted. But now they're hearing he's too unwell to travel anywhere. Russia passes yet another law that critics say will limit Internet freedom. And a British man found he's been paying for cable service he canceled four years ago, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

At these Paris hotels, it's up to you how much you pay

Priceline offers to let you name your own price for your hotel, but it's not quite literal. A group of Paris hotels are letting you stay at their hotel and pay as much as you want when you check out. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, and protests are mounting around the world. Plus autocorrect — it's much more complex than you might think. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An experiment in crowd-sourced news for China 'disappears' at the hands of government censors

China's not known for its press freedom — though its citizens are voracious consumers of news. A new site, Cenci, had taken the country's journalism world by storm ... until censors decided to make it invisible. Meanwhile in Boston, you can buy soup in bite-size, edible balls. It's a Harvard researcher's idea to cut plastic waste. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Even Mandela meets his heroes in heaven

One of Nelson Mandela's own heroes, boxer Baby Jake Matlala, died just two days after the former South African president. While those two may be meeting in heaven, down here, people are analyzing Mandela's memorial service — from Obama's handshake with Castro to a man who pretended to interpret the ceremony for the deaf. And China tries a positive spin on its pollution, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Sochi Olympics will have security on full display

The investigation continues into the terrorist attacks in Russia earlier this week. While there's been no claim of responsibility, officials are already worrying about what it means for the Olympics. Security is expected to be unprecedented. Plus Jihad Jane looks set for a long prison sentence and Edward Snowden pushes Julian Assange out of the spotlight in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

New Zealanders will vote on whether to update their flag

A flag is usually a symbol of national pride. But not necessarily in New Zealand, where voters will get to decide whether to ditch the design that dates to colonial times. And for some reason a Cadillac ad that lauds America's work ethic and paints Europeans as slackers just rubs some Europeans the wrong way. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.