Global Scan

PRI.org has a daily roundup and email newsletter that helps you find interesting perspectives on what's going on around the world. Sign up for a PRI.org account and subscribe to our newsletter to get it delivered to your inbox.

Global Scan

Greeks wonder who was buried in this huge tomb 2300 years ago

It is the largest ancient burial site in Greece and, just a month after its announcement, it has brought new life to two small villages 60 miles east of Thessaloniki. But who was important enough to be buried there? Meanwhile in India, when some families are planning a wedding, the first to-do is to hire a marriage detective. And Russian President Putin decides to intervene in a children's show, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

European youth have started the #BloodBucketChallenge

After the success of the Ice Bucket Challenge that swept YouTube, European young people are hoping for viral success with a campaign to bring world attention back to the conflict on Ukraine's eastern border. Meanwhile, killing is the subject of newly-published scientific research. In this case, the killers, though, are chimps. And a Chinese tennis star retires in her 30s, having brought tennis and a bit of sports freedom to her home country, in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Now you can have airline food without leaving the ground

Frequent fliers at least get points for suffering through airline cuisine. Soon Germans will get the option of having it delivered to their homes. And what does a business class meal cost on the ground? About $12. Newly-released files from Britain's National Archives confirm that the country's WWII spies had to pass a seduction test by "special agent" Fifi. And 50 South Koreans will experience an oxymoron — competitive relaxation. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

MIT researchers create a robo-cheetah that runs and jumps off-leash

It's not much of a looker when it comes to feline curves, but MIT's robotic cheetah sure can run. It is novel in both its motors and the math that calculates how hard it springs across uneven terrain. In Scotland, bankers are preparing for the worst — a run on banks if Scots vote "yes" to separate from Britain on Thursday. And we look at the sexy brewing device for coffee that was a favorite of James Bond and is coming back into fashion. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just how big is that comet the European Space Agency is going to land on?

Out in space, comets don't seem that big compared to planets and all. But this chunk of rock and ice would rival the tallest mountains we know. Some have even created photos showing how it would tower over Los Angeles. Meanwhile in Australia, a Pizza Hut makes a major PR gaffe when it decides to throw in a free pet with every large pizza order. And the American-raised son of a terrorist decides to tell his story. All in this edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

Pakistan says it has captured the men who shot Malala in 2012

When Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head two years ago, the Taliban in Pakistan claimed responsibility. On Friday, the Pakistan army said it had caught a gang of 10 men behind the attack. Elsewhere in Pakistan, a new branch of al-Qaeda seems to have bungled its first attack, but wants the press coverage anyway. And a 45-story skyscraper of squatters is being cleared in Venezuela, all in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

If Egypt feels too dicey to visit, now you can walk around there with Google

Tourism is way down in Egypt due to the last three years of political unrest there. But if you have always wanted to explore the pyramids, Google Street View is now ready to help you. As the US prepares for war on ISIS, the terrorist group has extended its propaganda front with a western-focused, cutting-edge video production wing. And we ask whether western media should show the gruesome images coming from war and terrorism, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Europe's comet lander snaps a killer selfie

Space may be the final frontier, but one of Earth's explorers paused earlier this month to snap a picture of what its seeing. Europe's Rosetta comet explorer probe grabbed a picture of the comet it's studying, and in the process caught a bit of itself, too. It's being called an interplanetary selfie, and it has taken the Internet by storm. That story and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Could this trout really be as smart as a chimp?

Scientists have long thought there were certain signs of intelligence only shared by humans and chimpanzees. So they were startled to find one of those characteristics in a fish — a very smart fish, yes, but still a regular old coral trout. Meanwhile in Africa, Gambian legislators plan to increase the punishment for anyone convicted of being habitually gay to life in prison. And a doctor discusses the cruel impact of Ebola in Africa, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

These activists swim with sharks and crocodiles so you'll stop killing them

When you think of swimming in lakes or the oceans, chances are you think, just briefly, about sharks or maybe crocodiles. And odds are it's not a good feeling. But these two activists want you to know, they're not so bad. Meanwhile, a crowd-source journalism site makes a serious allegation about the shoot-down of Malaysian Airlines flight 17 over Ukraine, and ISIS makes a serious threat against Twitter employees.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Social posts from Jihadi fighters make the war in Syria sound almost fun

From the look of their social media posts, British Islamists fighting to oust Syria's government and impose Islamic law are having a terrific time. Even the martyrs seem to be smiling. Also, you might want to thank some immigrants the next time you sip your favorite California wine. And the autobiography of famed singer Morrissey apparently was too gay for the US. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Free hugs? You'll go to jail for that

You'd think no one could possibly object to something as simple as free hugs. But that's not the case in Saudi Arabia. Plus, a boy who died 24,000 years ago has given clues to the origin of Native Americans in the US, and the Israeli government is struggling with the mafia. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

If you are cold today, think warm thoughts ... or head to Australia

Just as the US and Canada face record cold temperatures this week, Australia is hitting record highs — up to 121 degrees Fahrenheit. Also, China says its women should stop turning their breast milk into novelty soaps, Saudi Arabia gets its first female law firm, and an American designer may be the world's greatest diamond counterfeiter. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the US secretly training Syria's rebels?

What is at stake in the ongoing Syrian civil war? Enough that the US is considering increasing its role in supporting the rebels — perhaps providing direct military support and training. Meanwhile, Roman Catholic Pope Francis says he might consider allowing priests to marry, while Belgium considers the possibility a hitman was behind an attack on a Jewish museum this weekend. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A Nobel Peace Prize for Edward Snowden?

A former Norwegian minister nominates Snowden for the Nobel Peace Prize. India's highest court maintains the country's ban on gay sex. And an Iranian teacher stands up for a stricken student who is bullied. All that and more, in today's Global Scan

Global Scan

A new study identifies a promising technique to reverse male infertility. And it involves mice

Infertility in men can be an emotionally-difficult problem — and one that has been largely untreatable. But a new therapy being tested in mice is showing promising results. Plus, cell phone recordings tell of the final moments for South Korean teenagers caught in the ferry disaster. And a German exchange student is killed in America. All that and more in today's Global Scan.