Global Scan

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Global Scan

Prince William's US trip seems more political than regal

When British royalty comes to the US, Americans go a little nuts. But this trip by Prince William has the Brits scratching their heads. Meanwhile, at least one British parliamentarian is looking to the US for ideas on how to deal with anti-abortion protesters. And the Chinese government is hunting for a corrupt Chinese official who was obsessed with gold.

Global Scan

Take a trip through London at night — with the lights off

Nights during a blackout in a big city offer a scary vision to some. But this new video shows how London's architecture would be set off by the night sky, if city lights weren't obscuring the view. Meanwhile, across the Channel, France has decided to pay foreign victims sent to Nazi camps in French trains. And China asks for US help to crack down on corrupt fugitives, in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When NASA's newest spaceship takes off Thursday, it'll be back to the future

Ever since NASA mothballed the Space Shuttle, it hasn't flown a spaceship. That will change on Thursday morning, when it test-launches the Orion space capsule, which is designed for possible Mars travel . Meanwhile, South Korea intends to rankle North Korea with another large Christmas tree in the DMZ. And a new ranking of government corruption gives the US middling marks.

Global Scan

What happens to displaced refugees when the World Food Program goes broke?

More than a million Syrian refugees could face hunger and death in the near future because the UN is running critically short of funds to provide food relief. And today is Giving Tuesday around the globe —have you donated to a non-profit yet? And Iranian cyber-attackers have infiltrated dozens of Western businesses in 16 countries. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

That little bit of vandalism will cost you $25,000

If you've ever visited the Colosseum in Rome, you know how truly stunning it can be. One visitor, however, decided to commemorate his trip by leaving his mark on the historic structure. Local officials, however, didn't take kindly to that. That story and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to police, Russia gets the gold

Russia is proud of being out in front of other countries. But on one measure, it might not be quite so proud. It has more police per citizen than any other country tracked by the UN. Meanwhile, the Loch Ness monster is back in the news after 18 months without a peep. And a 100-year-old woman has a long-held dream come true and it gives her shivers. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'Magic' mushrooms to treat depression? Some researchers think so

Hallucinogenic mushrooms are one potential treatment for depression. Another is hip hop music — it seems the dark lyrics might reach those who feel equally hopeless. Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin comes to the rescue of China's first lady and his gallant act gets erased by Chinese censors. And in Pakistan, a group of schools hold an "I am not Malala" Day. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

These are the seven countries the US military has bombed in the last three years

US officials launched an air attack on ISIS rebels in Syria this week, making the war-torn Middle East country the seventh state — at least — to see US airstrike since 2011. Meanwhile, an African nation torn by Ebola is agreeing to halt logging in exchange for development aid. And in Iraq, the nation's Kurdish minority is looking at what it has achieved — with high hopes for its future.

Global Scan

Rodman plays ball with North Korea's dictator

Basketball diplomacy, Dennis Rodman-style, keeps getting stranger. Scientists streak the South Pole and come away with frostbite in tender places. China overtakes Europe in R&D spending. And did you know that Hitchcock made a Holocaust documentary? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For Americans, Canada is becoming a bargain again

The Canadian dollar has been about equal with the US dollar in recent years. But as the US Fed moves to ease up on its stimulus, the loonie is falling. In Russia, 50 years of work still hasn't fully domesticated the wild fox. And an Indian comic takes on the country's widespread use of skin lightening creams, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

If you want to climb Everest, you're going to have to help clean it up

if you've ever thought about climbing Mount Everest, you better pack an extra trash bag. A new rule requires all climbers to bring down eight kilograms of garbage over and above their own trash. Odds are they won't be bringing down banana peals, at least if you believe new research that bananas could be under threat. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Greenland's snow is getting darker, and that's bad for you and me

Greenland is home to a huge chunk of the Earth's frozen water. And every winter that ice is covered with snow, usually white snow that reflects sunlight back into space. But new information suggests that pollution and a warming climate are making that snow much darker — and consequently making it melt much faster. That story and more in today's Global Scan.