Global Scan

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Global Scan

This is where bitcoins are made

Bitcoins are big money these days. So bitcoin miners are setting up vast, secretive warehouses filled with computers to earn them. We explain how it works. Meanwhile, terrorist wannabes have a lot to learn, so they turn to "The Koran for Dummies" for a quick education. And superstitions about albinism have taken a cruel turn in Tanzania, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

That monkey selfie? The US government says it belongs to all of us

This cute selfie taken by a monkey who happened on a photographer's camera does not belong to the photographer. So say US regulators, who explain their reasoning. Meanwhile, China's effort to stop the desert's advance using trees has hit a snag. And chalk up another marketing fail — a lingerie line with the same name as a terrorist group. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For the British, burning the White House 200 years ago is cause for a cake and sparklers

So just how did the British Embassy choose to celebrate its friendship with the US on Sunday? With a cake commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Brits burning down the White House during the War of 1812. It apologized on Monday. Meanwhile, the Ice Bucket Challenge, which has taken social media by storm, is getting its own challenge. And how much could an old comic book sell for? Try $3.2 million.

Global Scan

Five apps that can help you keep an eye on what your kids are doing

Are you a frustrated parent who can't get your kid to answer your phone and text messages? Never fear, the Ignore No More app is here ... along with a few other mobile tools for parents. And if you're a fan of Nutella, you just might want to stock up fast. Also, did you know the situation in Iraq has the US helping a group it labels as terrorists? That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An ancient lost Mayan city reappears in Mexico

The Mayan civilization thrived more than a thousand years ago. Many of its cities simply disappeared as jungle overtook them. One of them was found decades ago and then lost again, until now. We also report on why women may be bearing the brunt of Ebola's attack in West Africa, and how Syrian cyber-warriors are using viral clickbait to trap enemies of the Syrian regime. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Russia demands that Bulgaria treat Soviet memorials with a little respect

Monuments showing heroic Soviet soldiers dot many of the former USSR satellite countries. And since the end of the Cold War, they have been refashioned by activists into political statements, infuriating Russian officials. In Africa, social media networks have been spreading a folk 'cure' for Ebola. And the Israeli government has kept independent human rights investigators out of Gaza. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is how many times British cops fired guns all of last year: 3

Updated

As the debate over gun control — and, now, the use of force by police — rages in the US and elsewhere, Britain offers a stark contrast. Police there rarely carry guns, fire them or kill anyone. Meanwhile, Beijing is getting machines that inspire people to both recycle and ride public transit. And Ebola is killing Liberians who don't even have the disease, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Nicaraguans are told to eat lizards — because of a drought

Nicaragua is suffering under a terrible drought, which is reducing food stocks and raising food prices. That's made it increasingly difficult for Nicaraguans to have an adequate diet. So government officials are encouraging Nicaraguans to raise and eat lizards. Meanwhile, if you've seen a popup ad recently, the man behind them wants you to know he's sorry. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Free hugs? You'll go to jail for that

You'd think no one could possibly object to something as simple as free hugs. But that's not the case in Saudi Arabia. Plus, a boy who died 24,000 years ago has given clues to the origin of Native Americans in the US, and the Israeli government is struggling with the mafia. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

If you are cold today, think warm thoughts ... or head to Australia

Just as the US and Canada face record cold temperatures this week, Australia is hitting record highs — up to 121 degrees Fahrenheit. Also, China says its women should stop turning their breast milk into novelty soaps, Saudi Arabia gets its first female law firm, and an American designer may be the world's greatest diamond counterfeiter. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Turkish protesters have a new target — their president's social media followers

Turkey's been embroiled in protests in recent months, with the country moving from crisis to crisis. The current crisis — over Internet freedom — has protesters targeting their president's Twitter followers. Meanwhile, in China, the government is saying no to low-quality recyclables. And Greece finally has a budget surplus — for the first time in almost 70 years. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the US secretly training Syria's rebels?

What is at stake in the ongoing Syrian civil war? Enough that the US is considering increasing its role in supporting the rebels — perhaps providing direct military support and training. Meanwhile, Roman Catholic Pope Francis says he might consider allowing priests to marry, while Belgium considers the possibility a hitman was behind an attack on a Jewish museum this weekend. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is where bitcoins are made

Bitcoins are big money these days. So bitcoin miners are setting up vast, secretive warehouses filled with computers to earn them. We explain how it works. Meanwhile, terrorist wannabes have a lot to learn, so they turn to "The Koran for Dummies" for a quick education. And superstitions about albinism have taken a cruel turn in Tanzania, all in today's Global Scan.