Global Scan

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Global Scan

Now you can stare at cute, cuddly penguin photos — and help scientists, too

Scientists studying penguins in the Antarctic have set up automated cameras to document the lives of the sea birds. Unfortunately, all that footage has to be categorized — and that's where you come in. Meanwhile, the Iraqi Air Force is smarting after an embarrassing blunder of reinforcing ISIS militants. And in China, the police were taking no chances with a group of ceremonial pigeons. Those stories and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

India's low-budget Mars probe snaps an iconic photo of the red planet

India's Mars mission keeps grabbing headlines — including this week, when the probe took this remarkable photo. Meanwhile, the US is shipping more of its oil overseas than at any time in the past 50 years, and that's a good sign gas prices are heading down. And ISIS thwarts US airstrikes with a speedy change in its tactics, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The 'Hands up, don't shoot' gesture from Ferguson moves to Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, pro-democracy protests are being confronted by an unprecedented level of police force — and that's led them to adopt a gesture that would look familiar to anyone who saw photos of protests in Ferguson, Missouri, last month. Meanwhile, scientists think they have developed a new solar power collector that will be more affordable and efficient. And North Korea's Kim Jong-un takes ill — in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

These are the seven countries the US military has bombed in the last three years

US officials launched an air attack on ISIS rebels in Syria this week, making the war-torn Middle East country the seventh state — at least — to see US airstrike since 2011. Meanwhile, an African nation torn by Ebola is agreeing to halt logging in exchange for development aid. And in Iraq, the nation's Kurdish minority is looking at what it has achieved — with high hopes for its future.

Global Scan

Greeks wonder who was buried in this huge tomb 2300 years ago

It is the largest ancient burial site in Greece and, just a month after its announcement, it has brought new life to two small villages 60 miles east of Thessaloniki. But who was important enough to be buried there? Meanwhile in India, when some families are planning a wedding, the first to-do is to hire a marriage detective. And Russian President Putin decides to intervene in a children's show, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

European youth have started the #BloodBucketChallenge

After the success of the Ice Bucket Challenge that swept YouTube, European young people are hoping for viral success with a campaign to bring world attention back to the conflict on Ukraine's eastern border. Meanwhile, killing is the subject of newly-published scientific research. In this case, the killers, though, are chimps. And a Chinese tennis star retires in her 30s, having brought tennis and a bit of sports freedom to her home country, in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Now you can have airline food without leaving the ground

Frequent fliers at least get points for suffering through airline cuisine. Soon Germans will get the option of having it delivered to their homes. And what does a business class meal cost on the ground? About $12. Newly-released files from Britain's National Archives confirm that the country's WWII spies had to pass a seduction test by "special agent" Fifi. And 50 South Koreans will experience an oxymoron — competitive relaxation. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Dubai's traffic cops are getting Google Glasses

The Dubai police are hoping Google Glass will give them a leg up on traffic violators and criminals. In Turkey, though, a government official is being comforted after injuring his leg kicking a protester. And the CIA says it won't mix vaccine campaigns with its covert ops. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US agrees to, eventually, set the Internet free

The relationship between the US government and the Internet has been close since the US military created it decades ago. But now, in the face of a howl of protests, US officials have said they're ready to let go. If certain conditions are met. Plus an Indian diplomat, who just saw the charges against her dropped on Wednesday, faces charges once more.

Global Scan

Dennis Rodman brings his brand of basketball diplomacy back to North Korea

Dennis Rodman's controversial relationship with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un turned another page this week. The former NBA star was in North Korea this week to select and train a North Korean basketball team that will take part in an exhibition game in honor of Kim's birthday. Plus Egyptian activists are thrown in jail and elves — yes, elves — halt a highway project in Iceland, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

My affair? Next question...

François Hollande has long been under pressure for his policies. Now, he's under pressure around the details of an affair. Perhaps he needs a lesson from Abdul Saboor, praised as "Afghanistan's most honest man" in a country known for corruption. And is a woman on a swing a bit enticing? Some in Saudi Arabia say yes and want to stop it. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

What's the next best thing to a roll in the mud with pigs?

Chinese pigs need a genetic upgrade, so Britain has graciously offered to help China at a $74 million per year price tag. China may not have bragged about its pigs, but an international test showed Chinese kids at the top of the class. But there's a catch. And Iceland grieves after the the police kill a man, for the first time in the country's history. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

If Egypt feels too dicey to visit, now you can walk around there with Google

Tourism is way down in Egypt due to the last three years of political unrest there. But if you have always wanted to explore the pyramids, Google Street View is now ready to help you. As the US prepares for war on ISIS, the terrorist group has extended its propaganda front with a western-focused, cutting-edge video production wing. And we ask whether western media should show the gruesome images coming from war and terrorism, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Now who's throwing a fit about NSA eavesdropping? Add Germany to the list

Suspicions abound in this edition of the daily Global Scan. Newly-leaked documents show the NSA has spied on leaders and citizens of America's friends and foes alike. The Roma fall under suspicion of child trafficking, while they fear losing their legitimate children. And an Australian leader is suspicious over claims that fires raging in his country are an early sign of climate change. Those are some of the stories we're tracking in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

All the king's horses and all the king's men couldn't get Rob Ford out of office — again

Rob Ford is nothing if not a survivor. After being accused of patronizing prostitutes — a charge he denies — drinking and driving — a charge he admits to — and then making the sort of sexual comment that can't be repeated on a family-friendly website, he still hangs onto his job as mayor. Meanwhile, in Europe, it seems that in-flight phone calls may become OK. "Can you hear me now?" Ugh. Plus more in today's Global Scan.